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Minimum Spec for PC to use autocad / sketch up (designing softwares)


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Hi guys,              I would like to ask if know any good spec for a PC that is good enough to render and design 3d objects. since my father pass away I will be inheriting his broken pc and I migh

This all depends on what you are designing, how big it is, how complex the shapes are.  I've noticed while working as a CAD engineer at my job that working on huge laser scanned water treatment s

About the Software (i'll list only the relevant software, relative to the scope of interior / FFE / Furniture, Fitting & Equipment, based on my experience) 3D & 2D, Modeling, drafting &

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ayt I got a hold of my dad's old PC and here's the specs: 

- Ryzen 3 2200G
- 8gb x1 Memory
- A320M A PRO Mobo
-Fortress 700wattz PS
its about the same as mine.
There seems to be a problem coz it dies after a while with no warning or errors.
I'm suspecting its the Power Cord.


20210428_005542.jpg

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39 minutes ago, Condrad said:

There seems to be a problem coz it dies after a while with no warning or errors.

Not to take this off topic, but there are errors and events logged, you just need to know where to look.  These would then be used to determine if it was an operating system issue or a hardware issue such as power delivery.  That's where I'd start, for sure.  If left scratching my head, I'd do stress testing and monitor thermals to be sure it's not related to that - I could get that behavior from a multicore CPU by improperly attaching a cooling device, where everything would be fine unless the CPU ramped up usage for extended periods which would lead to throttling and eventually a hard crash/shutdown to protect the chip.  Keywords to google on this would be 'Find crash in Windows Event Viewer' and/or 'CPU-Z stress test' and/or 'memtest memory testing'.

If the Event Viewer research shows an OS or driver related cause for these shutdowns, you should consider running some windows tools to check out your OS:

Quote

When Windows is not working correctly, you will want to scan the file system - like verifying the integrity of a Steam game install, but for the entire operating system.  It usually takes around 30 minutes to run, or longer depending on the speed of the disk.
"If some Windows functions aren't working or Windows crashes, use the System File Checker to scan Windows and restore your files. Though the steps below might look complicated at first glance, just follow them in order, step-by-step..."
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/topic/use-the-system-file-checker-tool-to-repair-missing-or-corrupted-system-files-79aa86cb-ca52-166a-92a3-966e85d4094e

To verify the safety and security of your Windows installation, use the Microsoft Safety Scanner:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/threat-protection/intelligence/safety-scanner-download

 

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so here's what I gathered so far.

I left it running over night and as soon as I woke up the monitor has no display anymore its weird I was sure I turned off powersaving / sleep mode. I check the unit its not hot at all but its still running. I tried typing and moving the mouse but the monitor still wont light up. I cant even turn of the PC for some reason. 

So I had to unplug the cable just to turn it off. Anyone experience this before?

now I tried to change power settings turned of PCI Express power management on the advance options
and did the cmd command "powoerconfig -h off" restart pc. 

now I'm monitoring it again if the monitor shuts down again and I cant wake it up. hopefully this works.

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1 hour ago, Condrad said:

so here's what I gathered so far.

I left it running over night and as soon as I woke up the monitor has no display anymore its weird I was sure I turned off powersaving / sleep mode. I check the unit its not hot at all but its still running. I tried typing and moving the mouse but the monitor still wont light up. I cant even turn of the PC for some reason. 

So I had to unplug the cable just to turn it off. Anyone experience this before?

now I tried to change power settings turned of PCI Express power management on the advance options
and did the cmd command "powoerconfig -h off" restart pc. 

now I'm monitoring it again if the monitor shuts down again and I cant wake it up. hopefully this works.

Event Viewer will have logs of what happened most likely, again, that's where to look.

Also, not sure how you are monitoring, but you should be actively logging - HWMonitor from CPUID tools has this option - so you can view what occurred even if you have to restart or were not watching it actively.  Actively watching it would only tell you "that" it went black, which could be useless except for noting the time so you can cross-reference this with your HWMon logs and Windows Event Viewer events.

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yes I was actually monitoring it manually I was using MSI afterburner for the temp, I'm not really that techy. I've done a couple of trouble shoots on it that I found online and it seem to work the PC went to sleep mode and I manage to wake it up with the keyboard.

right now I'm just waiting if it happens again. 

Sorry Sempler I don't really know how to do what you've just suggested to me properly :x

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  • 2 weeks later...
9 minutes ago, =VG= keed said:

According to Crucial, a PC hardware manufacturer, it can cause damage by electromagnetic static. https://www.crucial.com/articles/pc-builders/how-to-clean-the-inside-of-a-computer

Nice timing cuz I just vacuumed my rig two days ago. Seems like I dodged a bullet.

Canned air is the alternative.

that was bad in the 80s... but today virtually every IT service employee vacuums or blows the computer clean. of course, theoretically, something can happen... but it is more likely that you destroy something yourself by touching it than that too much static builds up...

16 minutes ago, =VG= keed said:

Canned air is the alternative.

this is a fallacy. static is formed by friction. static does not matter whether it is vacuum or blown. would work both ways. So if you don't vacuum, you also shouldn't blow... ^^

 

 

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3 hours ago, =VG= 0100011000101 said:

that was bad in the 80s... but today virtually every IT service employee vacuums or blows the computer clean. of course, theoretically, something can happen... but it is more likely that you destroy something yourself by touching it than that too much static builds up...

this is a fallacy. static is formed by friction. static does not matter whether it is vacuum or blown. would work both ways. So if you don't vacuum, you also shouldn't blow... ^^

 

 

Just because it's less common now, doesn't mean DO IT. You wouldn't walk into an old minefield because theres a high chance a mine won't blow up... Doesn't mean one wont. It goes for when you build a PC, you always ground yourself due to static electricity, whats the difference between a vacuum? Compressed air is by far the better and SAFER option. BAD PRACTICE!

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10 minutes ago, Connor said:

Compressed air is by far the better and SAFER option

why?

 

the vacuum cleaner moves the dust in one direction, creating friction. the air from the can pushes the dust into the other and creating friction... in which direction is no static charge?^^

when vacuuming or blowing, this static can arise. hardly a difference.

of course you should ground yourself before you open a computer, but you should also stay grounded, or it doesn't make so much sense... I would still advise everyone beforehand. but whether he blows or sucks makes no difference. ^^

btw, in the past, minefields computers were much more susceptible to static influences.

30 minutes ago, Connor said:

ust because it's less common now, doesn't mean DO IT.

^^maybe i don't have enough common sense but i haven't yet found an explanation why one should be better than the other. just because something is repeated a thousand times doesn't make it any better/more correct.

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@=VG= 0100011000101 @Condrad the main static danger is a charge building up on your vacuum's nozzle. All the hairs, dust and other crap passes through that 1 concentrated hole. This can potentially build up enough static charge to fry a component if you bring the nozzle too close to one of them when enough charge is built up. Canned air is free of dust, so nothing that violently rubs the inside of the canned air nozzle as it exits. The risk is rather low, but enough for some shops/manufacturers to not bring vacuums too close. My friend used to repair PC's before covid and he'd use a vacuum at a few inches distance, which would suck all the dust that he blew off with bursts of compressed air. He'd never let a vacuum part touch or get too close to any component.

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PRO TIP:  Don't suck -- blow!

https://www.amazon.com/Compucleaner-Durable-Plastic-Electric-Pressure/dp/B07RKYWBD2

T8V7K8V.jpg

 

Regarding what was said above, all points thoroughly made, the takeaway should be that static can be a concern regardless of suck or blow, canned or vacuum pressure.  Yet, until there is a better way to remove dust buildup from impossible to reach areas, there is greater risk by not cleaning.  It is the lesser of two evils.  I had my own in-home PC Fix-it business called "PC Field Medics" for a number of years, I was my own "Geek Squad" of 1, and cleaning the computer was the first ten minutes of any 1-hour reset job.  I used to roll with disk images of current Windows installs, would offload their data, flash their HDD with the image, replace their drivers, programs and data, and get out in less than an hour in most situations.  Even carried a case with so many types of RAM, so I could "boost" most any system while I worked on it. ;)  I had NEVER had any issue with static damage due to cleaning hundreds of computers out in the real world.
 

That being said, a few simple SOP's can ensure you don't "blow it" by increasing potential for damage:

  • First, turn off your computer.  Do not unplug it, but turn off the switch on the PSU (power supply).  This will not disconnect the ground your computer and case have established already.
     
  • Next, ground yourself and try to remain grounded during the procedure as you hold the plastic cleaning device (of any kind).  This is achieved simply by touching the metal case anywhere as you move it while blowing/sucking.
     
  • Next, tape down all case fans using masking tape or any tape which leaves no residue behind and is easily removed yet strong enough for the task of taping down the case fans.  This is to ensure that during any sucking/blowing, they do not spin up and explode due to overspeed.  You may want to wipe the areas you are about to tape if they are dusty themselves.  Curl over the end of the tape on itself to give an easy handle for removal when done.
     
  • Finally, NEVER touch the tip of the cleaning device to any computer component during the sucking/blowing process. This can ensure the only potential for static buildup is from the movement of air itself - and on that note, don't hold it in one position for a long period of time, motions should be swift and the entire process brief.  Dry air = more potential for static -- observe higher caution in those situations. If you must brush a component, ground yourself and then touch the part to ground it to you while you brush it.  Touch your brush tool to pull static from it, moisture from your hand or breath can help dissipate and discharge buildup for these very brief maneuvers.

 

If you were so overly concerned with such things before powering back up, providing a break after your task, perhaps grabbing lunch for a couple hours is likely enough time for most any *minor* static buildup anywhere to naturally discharge by at least half.  When numbers are already very tiny and quite possibly within tolerance margins for these parts or components in question, this becomes more and more of a non-factor.

Again, IT pros clean, PC users everywhere clean, and our parts are not popping off like 7.62mm rounds tossed in a fire... All we can do is minimize the potential for damage and definitely avoid things that very much will cause damage such as sucking/blowing case fans past their rated tolerance levels for overspeed causing them to explode and shoot plastic into the computer potentially damaging other components.

 

*edit: obviously, the mention of compressed air in the post(s) above referring to "Canned" air for cleaning computers, which has a component to minimize moisture when discharged as directed, in bursts - compressed air from a compressor like those used to fill car tires or power tools is a big no no for blowing out computers due to the unchecked moisture and difficult to regulate air velocity.

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16 hours ago, =VG= 0100011000101 said:

take care of the fan and vacuum as much as you want...

Yah I was just mainly vacuuming the fan. but i didnt know the danger of vacuuming good thing I actually didn't vacuum to close (X_X)
 

 

15 hours ago, =VG= keed said:

Nice timing cuz I just vacuumed my rig two days ago. Seems like I dodged a bullet.

haha xD
 

 

8 hours ago, =VG= SemlerPDX said:

T8V7K8V.jpg

looks like a need this blower

 

 

11 hours ago, Connor said:

Compressed air is by far the better and SAFER option. BAD PRACTICE!

I'm SORRY  D8......................


Now I'm paranoid about Cleaning the PC ( O_O). I know about static on the pc when you try to clean it. but this level of detail is new to me. thank you for taking your time to point out what I need to do much appreciated.

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I'm maybe a little late to this whole vaccum vs compressed air fiasco, but I just needed to write the following below so bad:

16 hours ago, =VG= 0100011000101 said:

So if you don't vacuum, you also shouldn't blow...

That's what she said! 😆

 

Now that my shit and giggle is done....

 

I've used both to clean a PC:

I've vaccumed many many times, without issues. However I was always doing it carefully because I was paranoid that my vaccum was so powerful with its sucking power, that it might suck something important thats super tiny or something,.  So I kept some distance with it sucking dust, never touched the tip (insert TWSS joke here).

Now I just use a tiny turbo looking electric blower every year watching the dust shooting up into space making the Polish jealous. Again with no issues whatsoever. As long as you don't overpower your dust cleaning tools you should be fine. It is dust you are dealing with after all anyway. 

I personally dont bother with grounding myself with those fancy shmancy grounding wires like linustechtips does or any other shit, I just turn it off, switch off the power supply while the cables plugged in and hold the power button for a few seconds. Then I carry on. Of course everyone has their own way of doing it. some have short-cuts, some don't. Just because I don't have issues doesn't mean you won't either. It's kind of like a lottery ticket but those who win just gets shot in the face. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Condrad said:

I know about static on the pc when you try to clean it. but this level of detail is new to me. thank you for taking your time to point out what I need to do much appreciated.

It's nearly a non-issue.  All things stated for factual reasons about facts.  You'll never run into a static issue cleaning - just don't blow the thing apart or suck up something important! ;)

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