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Found 11 results

  1. Version 1.41

    4,184 downloads

    *Please be sure to download the AVCS CORE Profile from this download section as well, it is now a requirement for any AVCS4 game profile I release, such as the upcoming Elite Dangerous profile, and more... *Originally, this was designed for Falcon BMS version 4.34 - since then, it has always been and will continue to be updated to work with the latest version of Falcon BMS. Pro tip: never include a game version in URL's or graphics Profile for VoiceAttack by =VG= SemlerPDX Description: These commands use VoiceAttack to translate the in-game on-screen radio menus from AWACS through Tanker into natural and intelligent voice command phrases that will fire keypress macros to help keep hands on the throttle and stick, and maintain immersion. As an additional option, these commands can be locked behind a push-to-talk mode bound to your UHF/VHF transmit buttons in-game, allowing any other VoiceAttack command unrestricted access if needed, while still restricting these BMS radio command macros. Finally, this single advanced control profile is extremely easy to edit or integrate into other profiles. At VETERANS-GAMING, we fly with friends or AI Pilots, or a mix of both on our 24/7 Public Korean Campaign in Falcon BMS. We may go out with an AI wingman only to have a friend take their place mid-flight. For this reason and others, I created this VoiceAttack profile based around restricting when the computer can execute keypress macros that match voice phrases, having to first check if that pilot was set to a human pilot and therefore disregard commands for that pilot. Thanks to user requests during the beta, there is now an optional mode to reverse the Human Pilots system, to assume all pilots are humans unless told otherwise, and also a system to choose a different keyboard layout than QWERTY. I have also added an optional Audio Feedback Mode to play a short radio cue sound when a command is successfully recognized. Included is a single profile that handles every callsign and radio command variation in Falcon BMS, with instructions on how to add any custom callsigns to the single profile. The focus of this profile is only on the in-game Radio Menus, and creating an immersive interaction layer through VoiceAttack that is easy to manage and update, or integrate into other Voice Control systems for Falcon BMS. My goal was an intuitive system, so there is no user manual - only a few infographics and quick reference pic of all the radio commands. I personally keep that final pic on my tablet for reference when flying, to find radio commands I seldom used in the past when they were more difficult to access while busy with HOTAS in the pit. Say goodbye to the keyboard, and enjoy the immersion! Cheers! Features: see full details in post ↓ Sample Pics: https://imgur.com/a/xuclI0a (download file contents)
  2. Parts List & Links Preparing the Sensor Preparing the Case Preparing the Arduino Final Assembly Uploading the Code Get Help & Support I have written a new voice control profile called 'AVCS SENS' for VoiceAttack specifically dealing with sensors and weather commands. I wanted to use the Shared Memory feature of the AIDA64 Extreme sensor monitoring program to enable my VoiceAttack profile to speak the requested computer sensor value when asked over text-to-speech. Once I had sensor values from AIDA64 Extreme in VoiceAttack, I then added a DHT11 Temperature & Humidity sensor to the Arduino Uno on my prototype breadboard, connected to my PC through USB. Now reading this as well from my VoiceAttack profile, I could do a little math to get a more absolute and objective value from the computer sensors, a CPU temperature in "degrees over ambient", for example, or "delta-T over ambient" as you may hear it called in analysis videos such as this one here talking about case testing methodology used by Gamers Nexus. This is the true means to understand what computer sensors for temperature are reporting at any given time, by first accounting for the temperature of the room. Finally, with this relative sensor data now available, I've been able to write a simple diagnostic algorithm which can identify & flag atypical sensor values, as compared to stored baseline values on file, for voice commands in VoiceAttack. Without an AVCS-DHT1, outdoor weather and sensor report commands are still available, yet indoor weather & sensor diagnostic commands will be unavailable. I wanted to make it possible for anyone using my new AVCS SENS profile for VoiceAttack to either be able build their own AVCS-DHT1 USB external temperature & humidity sensor, or buy one designed & built by me, according to this simple Arduino project build guide, and therefore unlock these additional voice command features for AVCS SENS. My DIY USB Temperature & Humidity Sensor 'AVCS-DHT1' - for use in my AVCS Voice Sensors & Weather Profile parts list below contains links to specific items which I directly purchased myself for this project on Amazon only, but any store will do, and also any equivalent part which performs the same will work (brand names/quantities do not matter!) if you are using a different case than the exact one linked below, or other components, please see the note in the AVCS SENS Wiki page regarding Sensor Calibration Project Required Parts List (all prices listed in USD - price and availability may be different past last publish date of this guide) Arduino Nano (or equivalent clone) - with NO header pins soldered on! (HiLetgo Nano v3.0 5V) (3 pack) - $24.49 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DLIJQA2 $8.16 per board USB Cable - USB 2.0 Type A to Mini-B (3ft. or 1 meter, at least) (or equivalent part) (iSeekerKit Nylon Braided 3ft.) (3 pack) - $8.99 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08LL272SK $3.00 per cable DHT11 Temperature Humidity Sensor Module 3.3V-5V (or DHT22, or equivalent part) (HiLetgo w/Dupont Wires) (5 pack) - $10.29 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DKC2GQ0 $2.06 per sensor Plastic Electronics Project Case @ 1.97" x 1.10" x 0.59" (50mm x 28mm x 15mm) (Zulkit ABS Project Boxes) (5 pack) - $7.99 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PZ24LFD $1.60 per item Metal Film Fixed Resistor 10K ohm (0.5Watt) - just one will be needed (EDGELEC Pack of Resistors) (100 pack) - $5.99 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07QJB31M7 $0.06 per resistor Strong Double-Sided Foam Adhesive Tape (or equivalent product) - only need a few inches (Gorilla Brand Heavy Duty Mounting Tape) (1" x 120" roll) - $11.34 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B082TQ3KB5 $0.20 approx. amount used Neodymium Magnet 8mm x 2mm (round, size is important!) - just one will be needed (FINDMAG Box of Magnets) (100 pack) - $9.99 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09BB1VT4J $0.10 per magnet Total: $15.18 (USD) (for 1 sensor*) - (total if all parts purchased with amounts above: $79.08) *(also required - drill/rotary tool, solder and soldering iron, electrical tape, tweezers, scissors, 'nippers', 'spudger' type tool, and SuperGlue) This project requires the following skills & knowledge: Basic understanding of Arduino (what it is/what it does) Basic experience with electrical soldering Basic skills with drill or Dremel/rotary tool and bits Use of and precautions relating to SuperGlue type adhesive Ability to make precise cuts with scissors within 1-2mm Ability to carefully follow instructions (some are crucial) Entry level experience with VoiceAttack (import profile, etc.) Ability to work w/ tiny parts in a small space in timely manner A positive attitude and willingness to adapt and overcome (not exactly required, but always recommended ) Part 1 - Preparing the Sensor preparing the DHT sensor and stripping the braided wires - image a1 1. Separate the DHT11 (or DHT22) from the breakout board it is mounted on (if not supplied without one). Either snip the wires from the DHT as close to the board as possible with "nippers" (image a1), or de-solder them from the breakout board. If supplied with the Dupont ribbon wires, remove the plastic ends and prepare the wire ends by cutting them even and strip the wires leaving at least 1.5cm bare. We want around 75-100mm (2.95-3.93") of flexible braided wire so we can zig-zag the excess, allowing us to remove the plastic lid with sensor and not risk yanking the soldered wires out. solder wire ends - image a2 2. Twist the wire ends and tint them with solder to make them stiff, yet not so much as to increase their width with too much solder & slag - three of them must fit through the holes on the Arduino. 3. Once the DHT has been separated from the breakout board, with the side with holes facing you and pins down, cut the third pin from the left, or second from the right, as in image a1. gently bending the pins, resistor legs, and wires - image a4 4. Prepare the DHT pins by gently curving them into hooks facing away from the side of the sensor with holes. Gently bend the legs of the 10K ohm resistor (as shown in image a4) so that it will sit in the hooks of the two DHT pins closest together, as seen with the sensor face down (holes down, as in image a5). resistor placement - image a5 5. Bend two of the three wire ends away laterally away from the third wire, into a gentle hook shape, and the third wire opposite those in the same manner. Lay the 10K ohm resistor into the right two wire-hooks of the DHT sensor (face down - image a5). final goal for the resistor, legs, and wires: flat & straight - image a3 NOTE: The Resistor should be offset in a manner where its bulk and width can mostly lay flat along side the wires and not on top of them once completed (image a3). gently crimping the DHT pins around resistor legs & wires - image a6 6. Lay the wire "hooks" into their corresponding DHT wire "hooks" over the resistor, and if able, use a tweezers to gently compress these DHT wire hooks to contain the wires and resistor for soldering, as well as the wire "hooks" themselves. If this is not possible, you may want to secure the DHT to the table with scotch tape, lay the three wires in place in their "hooks", and scotch tape down the wires to the table with a gentle pull, to ensure they remain in place while soldering them firmly in place as one connection. soldering to the DHT - image a7 7. Solder each connection so that the wire, the wire "hook" from the DHT, and the resistor are fully encased, and not touching each other. trimming legs from resistor, and any protruding slag - image a8 8. When cooled, use "nippers" to nip any protruding slag or wire ends, and the trailing legs of the resistor as it exits the solder as in image a8. The wires should travel flat following the rear plane of the sensor, so that later, the front face of the sensor (with holes) can protrude out of a hole we will cut in the case lid. Refer to images a3 and a8 to see the resistor in-line with wires, as an example. wrap wires separately - image a9 9. Finally, wrap each exposed solder point with a separate small piece of electrical tape to ensure each cannot bridge contact with another in the event that something gets bent. Just sandwiching a small rectangle of tape over each one will do, even if each has a tail of tape hanging off. These bits of tape will be covered and held in place permanently once the sensor is mounted into the lid later. SAFETY SAVES LIVES - SAFETY GOGGLES SAVE EYES! BE SMART AND USE APPROPRIATE SAFETY GEAR WHILE WORKING! Part 2 - Preparing the Case drill 12 tiny air holes - image b1 1. Carefully remove the lid from the case - while holding the base in one hand, lid up, with the notch in the lid away from you, use a fingernail in the notch along with pressure from your finger to pry that side of the lid upwards. If using a tool, be careful not to use too much pressure or the soft ABS plastic may deform or scratch if the tool jumps too fast once the lid becomes free. keep notch at bottom - image b2 2. For the lid, we want to create a rectangular hole that will allow the front face of the DHT sensor to protrude. The tapered sides of the blue sensor case widen towards its back which will keep it from protruding farther. The lid is 25.9mm wide & 47.75mm tall. The approximate width of the hole will be at or under 16mm tall and 12.60mm wide. For this to work well, it is best to cut a slightly smaller hole than desired and slowly widen it with hand tools or low speed rotary tool - stopping and testing the fit until just right (as shown in image b6 below). It is not easy to get exact, I've tried. Just accept any slight tilt, it is a DIY after all. port is upside down - image b3 The goal for the USB hole is to make it flush with the bottom of the case as it exits, and as wide as the USB port itself (8mm). The port is 4mm tall, but as you can see in image b3, even I could not quite keep that height with that limit as I drilled and widened the hole. Again, stop and check the fit - first dusting out any bits of plastic from the process, and sliding the Arduino Nano upside down as shown for a test fit. It must slide flat with the case bottom and through the case wall as shown. 3. With the lid removed from the base, use a drill bit between 1mm-2mm at low speed to create 4 holes in the 'top', and 4 holes on each side near the top (as shown in image b1), for 12 total air holes. The passthrough hole for the USB mini-B port will require drilling and widening with hand tools or a rotary tool at a low speed. The port is about 4mm tall & 8mm wide. High speeds may heat and melt the ABS plastic, so if you are working at an area for too long, back off and let it cool down. place one small drop of SuperGlue at the arrow for magnet - image b4 4. Once all the holes are drilled and the rough edges cleaned up as much as possible, wipe the interior clean of plastic dust. Using a strong SuperGlue, place a very small drop inside the case at the top near the four holes you drilled, as shown by the arrow in image b4. Carefully place the tiny magnet over the drop of glue; non-magnetic tip tweezers or even chopsticks can really help - just be sure not to touch the SuperGlue as you position the magnet. test fit the sensor into lid - image b6 5. Finally, cut a strip of the double-sided adhesive foam tape about 25mm wide and 8mm tall - do not remove the backing yet! Once the SuperGlue has dried (give it a few minutes) place the strip of tape over the magnet (image b5, below). fully cover magnet with tape, do not remove backing (yet) - image b5 Part 3 - Preparing the Arduino setting the board to "Arduino Nano" and its COM Port - image c1 1. Open the Arduino IDE v1.8 (latest) (download and install first, if not already done) and make sure it is updated to current release version. Place the Arduino Nano on a hard, non-conductive surface, and connect the USB cable to the device and then to the PC. Refer to device instructions (per brand/model/type) as required, if the device driver is not installed automatically. Under the 'Tools' Menu along the top, select the COM Port of this device, and set the board to Arduino Nano (as shown in image c1), and unless directed by device instructions, leave the Processor as "ATmega328P". opening and uploading the Arduino Basics "Blink" sketch - image c2 2. Under the 'File' Menu along the top, select Examples > Basics > Blink to open this sketch (see image c2). Next, click the Upload button ( ) to send this sketch to the Arduino Nano. Verify that the onboard LED slowly blinks on and off repeatedly to ensure this board is functioning, and that sketches are uploading properly. If you have any problems at this stage, you will want to stop and perform other troubleshooting steps to verify that the Arduino IDE is set up properly to communicate with this board, and that the board itself is not faulty. See Addendum at the bottom of this guide for help. installing or updating the "Adafruit Unified Sensor" library - image c3 3. To get data from the DHT sensor, we will be using an open source DHT Sensor Library by Adafruit, which requires the Adafruit Unified Sensor Library, as well. In the Arduino IDE, under the 'Tools' Menu, select 'Manage Libraries...' (or press CTRL+i) to open this window - it takes a few seconds to open. First, select the Type of "All" (if not already selected), and the Topic of "Sensors". In the search field, type "Adafruit Unified Sensor". The list will be long, scroll down until you find the Adafruit Unified Sensor library (as pictured in image c3) - install it or update with the latest version, if not already. installing or updating the Adafruit "DHT sensor library" - image c4 4. Next, in that same search field, type "DHT sensor library". Again, the list will be long, scroll down until you find the item with the title "DHT sensor library" by Adafruit (as pictured in image c4) - again, install or update it if it is not installed with the latest version. When you are finished, close the Library Manager and disconnect the Arduino from the computer. If desired, use a light grit sandpaper on the edges of the Arduino Nano PCB board to make them smooth. AVCS-DHT1 Wiring Diagram (your resistor color may be different!) - image c5 5. Once you have verified that the Blink sketch is working from earlier steps, and that the Arduino IDE can properly upload to the Arduino Nano board, it's time to solder the wires from the DHT sensor to the Arduino. Follow the wiring diagram (shown in image c5), separating the ribbon cable to individual wires for flexibility, as needed. later, mounting will be upside down, as shown here - image c6 NOTE: As stated before, the Arduino Nano MUST be upside down (shown in image c6) in the end. You may wish to do as I have done, and push the wires through from the other (top) side of the board, soldering them into place on the underside (now facing up, like image c6). Unlike the diagram, the brown wire from these pictures is the black/ground wire, the red wire is the yellow/signal wire, and the orange wire is the red VCC/5V from image c5! Your wires may differ in color as well, if using those supplied with your DHT module as I have done. Do not get them mixed up - follow any wire back to the DHT to identify it properly. When complete, trim any protruding slag, or excess length from the wires as they exit the board, once cooled. Part 4 - Final Assembly gently press down on areas such as those noted with arrows - image d1 1. Cut a piece of the double-sided adhesive foam tape 23mm wide and 45mm tall, with a small notch cut out to allow wires to pass as shown in image d1. Do not remove the backing to expose the second adhesive side, this backing will remain on permanently as an additional barrier between the sensor, the Arduino, and the wires in the case. 2. Place the completed sensor and wires assembly into its slot you cut out in the lid, from the inside. Cover the entire unit with the tape you cut out, allowing the wires to fit through the notch. Use a dull plastic "spudger" type tool (image d1) to gently but thoroughly press down at all contact points, bends, and flat areas where the tape should make full contact with the lid and sensor. Avoid the area of the wires and resistor, and the soldering points - use only a finger or thumb and gentle pressure in the area over wires to ensure a light contact. We don't want to break any of the solder or unintentionally bridge the contacts. Do the same for the tape covering the magnet in the case - press into the bends and flat areas to ensure permanent contact. Do not compress the part on the top of the magnet too much - we need this pile to be between 3-5mm to make contact with the Arduino Nano when it is finally in place. first remove backing from tape, then apply the SuperGlue - image d2 3. Before proceeding, with the protective backing still on the tape covering the magnet (still "un-sticky"), test fit the Arduino Nano into the case one last time - make sure the USB port sits flush with the base of the case as it exits, and the PCB board is flush with the edge of the case with the USB port hole (such as in image d3). Ensure that the back of the Arduino overlapping the magnet touches the tape and the peel covering it - this is the last chance to make it taller with another bit of tape, if you used a different or thinner type of tape not recommended by this guide. It should be a foam type tape with some give, and adding to the height of the magnet enough to make contact with the Arduino (about as tall as the USB port on the other side, 4mm). When ready, first remove the backing peel entirely from the double-sided adhesive covering the magnet - a sharp pair of tweezers can help here, it is NOT EASY and your luck may vary (condolences, I use this stuff all the time because it is so great, but for this one flaw - actually getting the backing off once it's in place can be painful!). Once you're done fighting the Gorilla tape and got the backing peel off, place a small dot of SuperGlue inside the case near the USB port passthrough hole. In the example image d2 there is almost too much, half this much would do - you can use a cotton swab to soak up some of the glue before it dries, but this entire procedure must be done swiftly. Before the SuperGlue dries, very carefully slot the Arduino Nano into the case at an angle, with the USB port first, keeping the back from touching the tape yet - slide the Arduino USB port through the hole and then lower the back end down into position above the tape, keeping the PCB flush with the case wall, and the USB port through the hole as it makes contact with and compresses the SuperGlue. Quickly dab up any SuperGlue that may leak out of the hole and outside the case. apply light pressure on right and strong pressure on left - image d3 4. Referring to image d3, with light & gentle finger pressure, press down on the area noted by the arrow on the right, while also using a more firm finger pressure to press down on the area noted by the arrow on the left (over the tape/magnet). Be sure not to put a lot of pressure on the right where those components are, it is not necessary - the SuperGlue will do its job, we just need to give it light pressure to help spread the SuperGlue and ensure flush contact as we put greater pressure on the left where there are no components and we want full contact with that tape. fully assembled - image d4 5. Before closing the lid, allow up to several minutes for the SuperGlue to dry. Take this time to plan the bends or separations in the ribbon wire (if using one) so that each wire can sit in a sort-of zig-zag fashion once we do close the lid. In image d3, the wires are actually a bit long and will require an extra 'zag' to fit, so I have separated the wires nearly to the first bend. The first bend by the lid and notch in the tape must be acute & firm without crimping! Once the SuperGlue is dry, carefully guide the wires into places they won't impede as you close the lid - start from the far end away from the wires, and lower it into place over the USB port side lastly. Be careful not to force it closed, adjust as needed to ensure a tight fit without jamming the wires into hard crimps or bends which could sever tiny wires in the braid inside the wire jacket. The Official AVCS-DHT1 sticker label - image d5 6. The AVCS-DHT1 Sensor (being magnetic) is designed to stick to a PC case in a vertical orientation somewhere not far from the intake, but far enough from intake fans to not be 'cooled by the wind'. The back of the ABS plastic case on the sensor can potentially mar or scuff softer paint on a PC case, so it is advised to place a piece of black electrical tape or even Scotch Tape along this surface simply to ensure a softer contact with the PC. All AVCS-DHT1 sensors built by me and sold in the VG Store will have this sticker label (shown in image d5), which also serves this purpose as a softer backing to help avoid minor scuffing over time. If using one of these labels, carefully cut around the grey box on the label leaving about a 1-2mm margin as shown. You may consider peeling back and folding a crease in the wax paper backing, then folding back into place over the adhesive surface, before cutting the label to size - this will help more easily remove the backing once you've trimmed off the edges of the label. Unlike the high cost of shipping pre-built sensors around the world, I can offer these cool little AVCS-DHT1 sticker labels to anyone following this DIY Build Guide for a fairly low price in the VG Store including free domestic and international shipping to around 180 countries. It's much cheaper to mail a small envelope than a box, of course. Click Here to open the VG Store in a new browser tab to check out these sticker labels. Part 5 - Uploading the Code AVCS_DHT1_DIY_Sensor_v3 7. At long last, we can upload the Arduino sketch to the device and get some sensor data onto the computer! Start by connecting the AVCS-DHT1 sensor to the computer with the USB cable, and mount it as noted, on the front or side of the computer near the intake but not within range of wind created by intake fans. The area of the panel where the sensor sits should not be near any internal components which get hot under heavy PC use. 8. Open the Arduino IDE program again. Under the 'File' Menu, select 'New' (or press CTRL+N) to create a new sketch called "AVCS_DHT1_DIY_Sensor_v3". Select the entire contents of this new sketch and delete them so you have a blank text area to paste into. Next, Expand Contents of the code block above - copy the entire contents of the code block here from line number 1 through line number 86. You can copy the code block to your clipboard more easily by clicking the "Download Raw" button provided by Pastebin, and select all the text on that page & copy it. Finally, paste the entire code into your sketch in the Arduino IDE (overwriting any contents) and save the sketch (CTRL+S). Now we can upload the sketch from the Arduino IDE program to the Arduino Nano by pressing the ( ) upload button just as we did with the Blink sketch above. When uploading is done, close the Arduino IDE program and proceed with testing at step 9 below. If you see any problems in the errors and information window below the sketch when trying to upload and if the title bar over this information window at the bottom of the sketch does not show the words ( ) when done, stop and get Help or Support from the links in the Addendum at the bottom of this guide. AVCS SENS profile version shown above may differ from latest - image e1 9. Launch the VoiceAttack program and switch to the AVCS Sensors & Weather Profile (if not already running and loaded). When voice commands are available, say, "Open the Sensor Menu". The AVCS SENS Main Menu will pop up. Press the "OPTIONS" button, and then press the "Sensor Options" button. In the Sensor Options screen, press the "Test Arduino DHT11 Sensor" button - there will be a voice reply of either "Test Succeeded" or, of course, "Failed". Upon a successful test, the VoiceAttack Event Log (shown in image e1) will display several text messages, including a sample of the data received such as: AVCS-DHT1 Data: [AVCS,22.75,65.00,72.95,73.00,DHT1] DHT Monitoring in AVCS SENS is a secondary monitor tied to the Sensor and/or Weather Monitor. If either of these are started, DHT Monitoring will try to start. If no DHT sensor is detected, indoor weather & sensor diagnostic commands will not work. If both Sensor & Weather Monitoring are turned off while DHT Monitor is on, the DHT Monitor will also turn off. Congratulations on successfully building an AVCS-DHT1 Sensor! Enjoy the indoor weather & PC sensor diagnostic voice commands! *alternatively, if you were not so successful, please see links below in the addendum for help & support on a variety of topics. I am also happy to provide assistance here if you would like to reply below, or through private message here or on Discord - whatever is preferrable Addendum - Help & Support for this DIY Arduino Project If you need help, post up a reply below and I'll answer as soon as I see it. Otherwise, here are some helpful links pertaining to this project: AVCS Help and Support Links AVCS SENS Profile Download AVCS SENS Wiki Page AVCS Help Channel on Discord AVCS Bug Reports Contact SemlerPDX Arduino Links Arduino IDE Download Arduino Guide Arduino Help Center Arduino Forums Arduino Discord VoiceAttack Links VoiceAttack Tips & How To VoiceAttack Manual VoiceAttack Product Page VoiceAttack Forums VoiceAttack Discord "AVCS SENS", including the Profile Package for VoiceAttack, the AVCS SENS Wiki page, the AVCS-DHT1 Sensor and Sticker Label, and this DIY build guide, comprise creative works by SemlerPDX shared under CC BY-SA-NC-ND 4.0 March/June 2022 AIDA64 is not affiliated with AVCS or this DIY project. Images and text depicting the AID64 program(s), title, logo, or other elements belonging to AIDA64 or FinalWire Ltd. are used only for educational and/or instructional purposes, relating to demonstration & use, in this DIY project guide. AIDA64 is a Registered Trademark of FinalWire Ltd. ©2010-2022 All rights reserved.
  3. Version 0.95.0

    23 downloads

    Profile for VoiceAttack by =VG= SemlerPDX Primary Question-and-Answer Features: Temperature - Humidity - Forecasts - Weather Alerts (coming soon!) -- "How hot is it outside?" (or) "What's the weather gonna be like on Friday?" Sensor Averages - Sensor Reports - Sensor Diagnostics -- "What is the CPU temperature?" (or) "Run a Level 3 Diagnostic" Time of Day - Day of Week - Month - Year - Date -- "Is today the 14th?" (or) "Is it Saturday tomorrow?" Included 'Utility' Command Features: "Clear the Log" === Clear the VoiceAttack Event Log text messages with this voice command "Be quiet" === Halt all currently active text-to-speech or any (long) sensor report/diagnostics readout "Stop all Sensor Commands" === Halt any active VoiceAttack commands currently executing "Check a variable value" === Input the name of any VoiceAttack variable to see its value in the Event Log "Count clipboard commands" === Count all derived commands in dynamic phrases such as "[Example;Examples] [Voice;Voices] [Command;Commands]" --To open the Quick Command Reference Guide, say, "Open the Sensor Command Reference" --To open the user options Profile Menu, say, "Open the Sensor Menu" NOTE: When Weather Monitoring (or Sensor Monitoring) is OFF, these commands will be unavailable. Please review each options page inside the Sensor Menu, including the User Guides pages. Learn more about VoiceAttack here: https://voiceattack.com/ DESCRIPTION: Voice Sensors & Weather is a question and answer profile that replies to our questions about PC sensors, the local weather outside, local weather forecasts, and even indoor weather when using an external temperature sensor connected over USB. This is my second AVCS utility voice command profile alongside the Voice Calculator & Conversions profile for VoiceAttack, and I'm very happy with how this project has turned out after nearly 4 months of work! Local outdoor weather voice commands are made available through connection to the Open Weather API, and this public AVCS SENS project has its own access key for all users of this profile. When Weather Monitoring is on, new weather information is checked periodically based on user settings, and set to text variables which VoiceAttack can return on command through text-to-speech replies. New 7-day weather forecast data is gathered once a day, with options to adjust this all the way down to hourly when users enter their own Open Weather API access key. Computer sensor voice commands are made available when running the AIDA64 Extreme sensor monitoring program, through the Shared Memory option for External Applications under the program preferences. This program is required in order to use any internal PC sensor commands, reports, or diagnostics. AVCS SENS reads individual sensor data directly from active memory every few seconds, without ever logging anything to file. These values are averaged out and read back through text-to-speech replies on command for individual sensors, or as part of a group of all sensors in a report or diagnostic command such as, all sensors, or all CPU sensors, or all Graphics card sensors. Indoor weather voice commands are only available when an external temperature & humidity sensor is connected by USB to the computer. This "AVCS-DHT1" Sensor is an Arduino powered device designed with a DHT11 sensor in a small enclosure that sticks to the side of a PC case magnetically. A DIY Build Guide is available for anyone wanting to make one of these devices for themselves, or users can also buy one designed & built according to that same guide on the VG Store. Another feature unlocked by the AVCS-DHT1 is computer sensor diagnostics. Diagnostics voice commands are unlocked when using both AIDA64 Extreme and an AVCS-DHT1 sensor. With these, all PC temperature sensor values in text-to-speech replies will be said in "degrees over ambient", or a "delta-T over ambient" as you may hear it called in analysis and testing videos. This is the true means to understand what computer sensors for temperature are reporting at any given time, by first accounting for the temperature of the room. Using a simple algorithm, this allows AVCS SENS to identify & flag atypical sensor values as compared to sensor baselines previously established and saved to file. I do plan to continue development of this profile, and appreciate any feedback, suggestions, ideas, or bug reports. I have some goals to add to the currently undocumented Sensor TTS Alerts feature and to explain usage examples in the AVCS SENS Wiki page, and of course, find a more graceful way to handle voltage, amperage, and wattage voice commands (currently not fully functional in the v0.95 Public Beta Test). FINAL NOTE: This profile is in an open Public Beta Test phase, after several weeks of testing, and is expected to work as designed. If any issues arise, I am happy to address them, and will release profile updates as often as able to address anything that pops up now that it's out in the wild. I don't anticipate any problems, but I can only truly evaluate that with help from outside eyes. I'm also open to feedback regarding the AVCS SENS Wiki Page, the DIY Build Guide page, and even the demonstration video for this project. Thank you for helping me to test this profile and put it through its paces - I'm sure this will be a fun and useful addition to my AVCS utility profiles along with AVCS CALC! Cheers! =============== OPTIONAL WAYS TO USE THIS PROFILE =============== OPTION 1: Switch to the AVCS Voice Sensors & Weather Profile and say, "Open the Sensor Menu" to use OPTION 2: Open Profile Options for any of your Profiles, select Include Commands from other profile: "AVCS Voice Sensors & Weather (latest version)" -or- OPTION 2b: Open VoiceAttack Options and select Global profiles, then Include Profile Commands from the profile: "AVCS Voice Sensors & Weather (latest version)" ========================================================= The main sensors and weather monitoring "function" commands are almost entirely made up of Inline Function in C# and VB.net - feel free to review these scripts here: AVCS SENS - Voice Sensors & Weather - Inline Functions in C#/VB.net for VoiceAttack on Pastebin file contents and checksum:
  4. *Originally, this was designed for Falcon BMS version 4.34 - since then, it has always been and will continue to be updated to work with the latest version of Falcon BMS. Pro tip: never include a game version in URL's or graphics Profile for VoiceAttack by =VG= SemlerPDX Description: These commands use VoiceAttack to translate the in-game on-screen radio menus from AWACS through Tanker into natural and intelligent voice command phrases that will fire keypress macros to help keep hands on the throttle and stick, and maintain immersion. As an additional option, these commands can be locked behind a push-to-talk mode bound to your UHF/VHF transmit buttons in-game, allowing any other VoiceAttack command unrestricted access if needed, while still restricting these BMS radio command macros. Finally, this single advanced control profile is extremely easy to edit or integrate into other profiles. At VETERANS-GAMING, we fly with friends or AI Pilots, or a mix of both on our 24/7 Public Korean Campaign in Falcon BMS. We may go out with an AI wingman only to have a friend take their place mid-flight. For this reason and others, I created this VoiceAttack profile based around restricting when the computer can execute keypress macros that match voice phrases, having to first check if that pilot was set to a human pilot and therefore disregard commands for that pilot. Thanks to user requests during the beta, there is now an optional mode to reverse the Human Pilots system, to assume all pilots are humans unless told otherwise, and also a system to choose a different keyboard layout than QWERTY. I have also added an optional Audio Feedback Mode to play a short radio cue sound when a command is successfully recognized. Included is a single profile that handles every callsign and radio command variation in Falcon BMS, with instructions on how to add any custom callsigns to the single profile. The focus of this profile is only on the in-game Radio Menus, and creating an immersive interaction layer through VoiceAttack that is easy to manage and update, or integrate into other Voice Control systems for Falcon BMS. My goal was an intuitive system, so there is no user manual - only a few infographics and quick reference pic of all the radio commands. I personally keep that final pic on my tablet for reference when flying, to find radio commands I seldom used in the past when they were more difficult to access while busy with HOTAS in the pit. Say goodbye to the keyboard, and enjoy the immersion! Cheers! Features: *Push-To-Talk mode disabled by default. Say, "Turn On Push To Talk Mode" to enable Download: (Click Here) Tips for this profile: (click here to view tips) *On first import, you should say, "Initialize Profile" - after first time, this is automatic. Any attempt to use commands before this will trigger auto-initialization. If you get errors from my profile, Launch VoiceAttack and open Options (wrench icon in lower right): -Under last tab on top, System/Advance, check box next to "Use Nested Tokens" as in image 1 below -Unless absolutely required, during testing it's recommended to uncheck "Allow command segment info for composite commands" Open the profile - if not already done, group commands by category and consolidate multi-part commands as in image 2 & 3 below Click on the Description tab at the top to help sort commands further (see image 4) Read a semicolon ";" as the word "or" and look at long commands as having many options like saying "2;Two;Too;To;Wingman" (read as "2 -or- Two -or- Too -or- To -or- Wingman") Commands Reference: *Replace the word "Human" with "Computer" when All-Humans Mode is ON Normally, this profile assumes all pilots are Computers, use All-Humans Mode to invert this Say, 'Open the Command Reference', anytime to view available voice commands
  5. Version 0.91

    64 downloads

    *Please be sure to download the AVCS CORE Profile from this download section as well, it is now a requirement for any AVCS4 game profile I release, such as the upcoming Elite Dangerous profile, and more... Profile for VoiceAttack by =VG= SemlerPDX Description: These commands use VoiceAttack to translate the in-game on-screen SWAT menus from Moving through Breaching into natural and intelligent voice command phrases that will fire keypress macros to help maintain immersion in single player Ready or Not gameplay. As an additional option, these commands can be locked behind a push-to-talk mode bound to keyboard key or controller buttons, allowing any other VoiceAttack command unrestricted access if needed, while still restricting these RoN SWAT menu command macros. I have also added an optional Audio Feedback Mode to play a short radio cue sound when a command is successfully recognized (off by default). As with all my AVCS4 profiles, my goal was an intuitive system, so there is no user manual - only a few infographics and quick reference pic of all the SWAT menu commands. If you can think of a way to say a menu action, it's probably covered. I typically imagine sentence structures that can mimic most "any way you say it", and use those for my recognition commands to ease the learning curve. No need to memorize strict phrases like "Mirror Under Door" - most natural options are recognized already, just try what comes to mind at the time, such as, "Mirror that door" or "Mirror under this door", etc. If the way you like to say something truly doesn't work, you can easily add it through the included AVCS CORE Quick Command Creator - add your phrase the way you say it and make the action to execute the proper relevant command phrase already set. Say goodbye to the keyboard, and enjoy the immersion! Cheers! Features: TBD - This is an open public Beta Test profile for VoiceAttack v1.8.9 or higher. The game itself is in Beta, so this profile may develop over time. The purpose and focus of this profile is only on the Single Player SWAT menus. Say, "Open the Command Reference" anytime to view available commands (download file contents)
  6. Version 1.11

    2,205 downloads

    Profile for VoiceAttack by =VG= SemlerPDX Description: AVCS CORE is the new framework for any VoiceAttack profile I release in future, and provides awesome tools to any VoiceAttack user. It can be used alone and by itself, or as a base to build a VoiceAttack profile around, including its functions in your own creations. The Quick Command Creator cannot possibly replace the very easy and very powerful voice commands we can create through VoiceAttack in the standard fashion, but allow users to quickly create simple keypress commands for a phrase, or even advanced multi-step macros that can use a limited selection of common VoiceAttack actions. The very fun Voice Authorization System lets us create passphrases that we can gate a QCC Command behind, for example, "Execute self destruct mode", 'command code required!', "Picard 4 7 Alpha Tango", 'confirmed'. I've even created a special home page and forum section here at the VG website, and a channel in the VG Discord, to provide Help & Support for the many users of my profiles - with voice controlled bug reporting to make it easy to let me know when I need to fix something. Since AVCS CORE needs to load before any other AVCS4 Profile (including the AVCS4 Template Profile), it will be updated the least, and has been tested the most through a year and a half of development. Say goodbye to the keyboard, and enjoy the immersion! Cheers! Features: see full details in post ↓ Say, "Open the Command Reference", anytime to view available voice commands Sample Pics: https://imgur.com/a/mb7e8Kr (download file contents)
  7. Profile for VoiceAttack by =VG= SemlerPDX Description: AVCS CORE is the new framework for any VoiceAttack profile I release in future, and provides awesome tools to any VoiceAttack user. It can be used alone and by itself, or as a base to build a VoiceAttack profile around, including its functions in your own creations. The Quick Command Creator cannot possibly replace the very easy and very powerful voice commands we can create through VoiceAttack in the standard fashion, but allow users to quickly create simple keypress commands for a phrase, or even advanced multi-step macros that can use a limited selection of common VoiceAttack actions. The very fun Voice Authorization System lets us create passphrases that we can gate a QCC Command behind, for example, "Execute self destruct mode", 'command code required!', "Picard 4 7 Alpha Tango", 'confirmed'. I've even created a special home page and forum section here at the VG website, and a channel in the VG Discord, to provide Help & Support for the many users of my profiles - with voice controlled bug reporting to make it easy to let me know when I need to fix something. As I plan to release more and more VoiceAttack profiles for various games, I needed a framework to standardize my methods, and to help keep profiles used by other people up to date and in proper working order. I never quite expected such a large user base, and with that I've decided to offer much more direct support through in-profile options menus and help & support options that tailor themselves to whatever AVCS4 profile is active. By checking for just 8 bytes of an update number on the VG website when loading, AVCS CORE can provide a pop-up choice for users to view the latest changelog, apply the latest patch (or open the website to download a new major update version), or just postpone until later. I've even included an option to turn off minor patch update prompts, and to roll back to the last version if desired! The purpose of this profile is to function as the backbone of any AVCS4 game profiles I release, such as the current AVCS4 Falcon BMS Radios profile, and provide users with a host of profile and update controls. When AVCS CORE is first loaded by VoiceAttack, it will initialize itself and any other AVCS4 Profile that is switched to, bringing its full list of commands into the end game profile. This includes the Quick Command Creator and Voice Authorization System, with new commands or codes saved to the Active Profile's save file. Any other AVCS4 Profile that gets switched to will clear and re-load its own QCC Commands or VAS Passphrases (if any), working out of it's own save file as well. Included is the AVCS CORE profile package that includes the AVCS CORE Profile designed for VoiceAttack, as well as the optional AVCS CORE Framework blank Template Profile for VoiceAttack profile builders. To keep AVCS CORE startup fast for any AVCS4 Profiles, commands cannot be added directly to the CORE Profile, so the Template is available, and can include all of the functionality of AVCS CORE by including the CORE profile commands through its profile options. This profile will have its own save file and config files folder in the VoiceAttack Apps folder along side other AVCS Profiles data. Since AVCS CORE needs to load before any other AVCS4 Profile (including the AVCS4 Template Profile), it will be updated the least, and has been tested the most over a year and a half of development. I will continue to support all AVCS4 Profiles through AVCS CORE and its powerful profile control options. Say goodbye to the keyboard, and enjoy the immersion! Cheers! Features: *The optional Push-To-Talk mode is disabled by default. Say, "Turn On Push To Talk Mode" to enable Download: (Click Here) Tips for this profile: Please use the voice command "Open Help and Support Menu" to communicate any bug reports. These help menus can be expanded without new profile versions, so suggestions are welcome. Thank you for checking out AVCS CORE for VoiceAttack! (click here to view tips) *On first import, you should say, "Initialize Profile" - after first time, this is automatic. Any attempt to use commands before this will trigger auto-initialization. If you get errors from my profile, Launch VoiceAttack and open Options (wrench icon in lower right): -Under last tab on top, System/Advance, check box next to "Use Nested Tokens" as in image 1 below -Unless absolutely required, during testing it's recommended to uncheck "Allow command segment info for composite commands" Open the profile - if not already done, group commands by category and consolidate multi-part commands as in image 2 & 3 below Click on the Description tab at the top to help sort commands further (see image 4) Read a semicolon ";" as the word "or" and look at long commands as having many options like saying "2;Two;Too;To;Wingman" (read as "2 -or- Two -or- Too -or- To -or- Wingman") Commands Reference: Say, 'Open the Command Reference', anytime to view available voice commands:
  8. Version 1.1

    1,258 downloads

    Profile for VoiceAttack by =VG= SemlerPDX Currently Supported Operations: 'Squared' - 'Cubed' - Exponents - Square Root Addition - Subtraction - Division - Multiplication Percentages - Pi (word substituted for Pi to 14 decimal places) Currently Supported Conversions (to and from): Velocity === Feet per Second - Meters Per Second - Knots - Miles Per Hour - Kilometers Per Hour - Mach Length === Inches - Centimeters - Feet - Meters - Yards - Miles - Kilometers Temperature === Fahrenheit - Celsius/Centigrade - Kelvin --To use the Calculator, say, "Turn On Calculator" (or many natural variations of this, like "Start Calculating") --To stop using the Calculator, say, "Turn Off Calculator" (or, again, many variations, like "Stop Calculations") NOTE: When Calculator is OFF, even when a potential calculation command IS recognized, the command will immediately exit. Learn more about VoiceAttack here: https://voiceattack.com/ DESCRIPTION: Calculate up to two operations with up to three values, or a single conversion. So far, I have added some simple conversions for velocity, length, and temperature. Wildcard voice recognition uses asterisks "*" around the functional operator words to catch any spoken phrase which contains any of these words. As a result, it is meant to be turned ON when needed, and OFF when not, by use of the commands "Turn On/Off Calculator" (or many included variations, like "Start Calculating" or "Stop Calculations"). Currently, this calculator requires the user to be aware of their own order of operations, but will try to catch many known issues and correct them, such as "What is four subtracted from twelve?", where "12" is actually the first number. The operation (as interpreted) is always printed out in the VoiceAttack Event Log and the result spoken, if successful. It is also stored to memory by the name "Value" followed the number shown in the log. This allows use of that number or recalling that number at any time. The last result of any valid equation is stored in the word "that", and can immediately be used in the next calculation, and any previous value can be recalled to become the word "that". Previous results can all be referred to by their "Value" number from the results log, in natural speech, for a new equation such as, "Divide that by Value 14". The full calculation history can be requested at any time, listed in the VoiceAttack Event Log, or cleared - this is also cleared anytime the VoiceAttack program is restarted. Up to 99 previous equations and their results are stored before rolling over and over-writing starting back at Value 1. Decimal Places can be set (default 3) from 0 to 16, and will be saved and recalled between VoiceAttack sessions (saved to profile). A small Profile Update Check is performed once per session, when Calculator Mode is first turned on, and this checks a single decimal number on a blank htm page here on this secure website. Users can delete this action as noted in the Main calculations command, if undesired, but this will make a small note in the VoiceAttack Event Log if the profile is updated, just to let you know of any improvements, bug fixes, or changes. I plan to add on more conversions and maybe even special operations in the future, but for now, everything is working so well, I figured I'd release this first version for the public right away. FINAL NOTE: This profile makes use of VoiceAttack "Wildcard" commands, and here they are used to catch ANY speech which contains one of the Maths or Conversions operator keywords, and so it is possible for these commands to fire at undesired times. Always use the command to Turn OFF the Calculator when not in use. There are 4 options for how to make use of this profile. You can just switch to this profile when needed, and say, "Start Calculating", or you can include or import commands into other profiles. =============== OPTIONAL WAYS TO USE THIS PROFILE =============== OPTION 1: Switch to the AVCS Calculator Profile and say, "Start Calculations" to use OPTION 2: Open Profile Options for any of your Profiles, select Include Commands from other profile: "AVCS Voice Calculator (latest version)" -or- OPTION 2b: Open VoiceAttack Options and select Global profiles, then Include Profile Commands from the profile: "AVCS Voice Calculator (latest version)" OPTION 3: Switch to any of your other Profiles, and edit that profile - select "Import Commands" and find/select the AVCS CALC profile (ending in ".vap"), and import ALL Commands -or- OPTION 3b: Open the AVCS CALC profile, and select each command, right click and "Copy To" any profile. OPTION 4: Same as 3/3b above, BUT you ONLY Import the "Turn ON/OFF Calculator Master Mode" command* *Using OPTION 4, using "Turn On Calculations" (or any variation) will switch to and from this Calculator Profile as needed. This is the most strict way to deny calculation commands getting infrequently recognized (but exiting anyway) when Calculator Mode is OFF ========================================================= The main calculation command is almost entirely an Inline Function in VB.net - feel free to review this script here: AVCS Voice Calculator & Unit Conversions Inline Function in VB.net for VoiceAttack edited: typos, options
  9. Profile for VoiceAttack by =VG= SemlerPDX I will be running a Public Beta Test for AVCS CORE and AVCS4 Falcon BMS Radios (1.3.90b), and users are encouraged to try out both, or just AVCS CORE and its included Template Profile, if desired. Please use the voice command "Open Help and Support Menu" to communicate any bug reports. These help menus can be expanded without new profile versions, so suggestions are welcome. Thank you for checking out AVCS CORE for VoiceAttack! -Sem (Aug2020) v1.3.90b Full Overhaul & AVCS CORE Integration Update (beta) I'm very proud to finally offer the next version of AVCS4 BMS because it includes an entire set of profile control and support from my new AVCS CORE Framework Profile for VoiceAttack. While AVCS4 BMS has not functionally changed much from what users have come to expect, AVCS CORE adds entirely new features that remove any previous need to manually edit any commands in the traditional sense to modify any configuration settings or otherwise. The only significant new command added directly to AVCS4 BMS is "Edit the Callsigns List" (and phrase variations of it). This opens a simple Get Choice menu to offer options to add/change/edit/remove any callsigns recognized by the profile. After that, most everything comes from the required AVCS CORE Profile Framework that will load before AVCS4 BMS, adding commands and features, as well as allowing auto-profile switching by setting AVCS4 BMS as a "Preferred Profile" in the CORE Options Menu (say, "Open Core Options", poke around, have fun!) Features: see full details in post ↓ Please be sure to download the AVCS CORE 0.90b Profile from this download section as well, it is now a requirement for any AVCS4 game profile I release, such as the upcoming Elite Dangerous profile, and more... BETA Release AVCS4 BMS v1.3.92 Changelog Dec-6-2020 This is a Major Profile Update, and requires downloading and importing the latest AVCS4 BMS Radios (v1.3.92b) and AVCS CORE (v0.92b) profiles: Fixes/Improvements: -Improved AVCS_CORE and AVCS4 BMS profile initialization optimized again for decreased load time - most noticeable on first use -(AVCS4 BMS profile initialization should be even much faster now!) -Fixed infinite loop on Minor Version Rollback toggle and version display errors following toggle -Fixed International Decimals - All Decimal Variables now compatible for international users via cultural invariant token "DECINV" -Fixed All Wildcard Commands fixed to allow both Wildcard and non-Wildcard recognition ("anything that ends with" or "just the raw command") -Fixed Audio Feedback Mode not playing sound when commands recognized -Fixed Audio Feedback Mode on/off text entry in VA Event Log 'not set' BETA Release v1.3.90 Changelog Aug2020 New Commands: -AVCS CORE Commands Included into AVCS4 BMS Profile to lessen profile switching to CORE when it was needed -"Create a new Voice Authorization Phrase" and other included commands from Voice Authorization System -VAS can allow QCC commands to be locked behind a required authorization phrase as set by users, in up to 10 weighted levels -Integerated Bug Reporting and debugging options from AVCS CORE for easy troubleshooting -Versioning allows for Mutiple prior versions (reinitialization required) for easy profile version rollback if desired -Included UPDATE command to allow users to import previous saved user settings and saved Quick Commands from previous version of profile -Full profile control through command, "Open CORE Options Menu" -Better user support through command, "Open Help and Support Menu" (will expand in time) -User settings save file control through command, "Open Save File Menu" (includes save file backup and restore system) -...and much more (see posts at avcs homepage) Fixes/Improvements: -Set First Use to present user with Get Choice box for Default Keyboard Layout (QWERTY/AZERTY/etc..) -Setting 'CurrentBackupIndex' and 'SaveFileBackupCount' to 'Not Set' inside F_SFS_LOAD_ALL (was getting corrupted in save file) -Separated 'new_profiles.txt' file from AVCS4 profiles and AVCS CORE profiles to handle two imports before first time run/initialization of either -Added Duplicate Profile check from AVCS CORE, informs user of non-functional AVCS profiles (if ending in 'dash number' such as '-1') -Edited Preferred Profile command to allow for any user profile to be set to be auto-switched to after AVCS CORE finishes initializing ___ BETA Release v1.3.80 Changelog Mar2020 New Commands: -"Add/Edit Callsigns List" commands to add or remove callsigns recognized -"Add a new Voice Command" and others included from Quick Command Creator system - QCC can be used to create additional phrasings, just set action to execute another command (by name) -"Edit Keypress Timings" to open options menu to set custom timings Fixes/Improvements: -AVCS CORE Profile and Updates Management integeration (see AVCS CORE changelog) -Full Profile Update Control added with user choice, only downloads if allowed by user (only checks 8 bytes of a version number before that) -Profile Updates set to allow choice for majority of fixes/changes to occur without new VoiceAttack Profile download/import *called "LIVE UPDATES" -Physical Profile Updates set to allow previous versions to remain installed without conflict, and also import/uninstall previous version files *called "MAJOR UPDATES" -Fixed typo in command "Raygun" -- corrected from "Ragun" (first fix via new live updates system) -Created 'Add New Callsigns' system using Get-Choice boxes -Set most profile variables to config files in VA Apps Folder (edit with "Open Advanced Core Options" command) -Set most commands to Text Variables, read from config files
  10. Profile for VoiceAttack by =VG= SemlerPDX Description: AVCS CORE is the new framework for any VoiceAttack profile I release in future, and provides awesome tools to any VoiceAttack user. It can be used alone and by itself, or as a base to build a VoiceAttack profile around, including its functions in your own creations. The Quick Command Creator cannot possibly replace the very easy and very powerful voice commands we can create through VoiceAttack in the standard fashion, but allow users to quickly create simple keypress commands for a phrase, or even advanced multi-step macros that can use a limited selection of common VoiceAttack actions. The very fun Voice Authorization System lets us create passphrases that we can gate a QCC Command behind, for example, "Execute self destruct mode", 'command code required!', "Picard 4 7 Alpha Tango", 'confirmed'. I've even created a special home page and forum section here at the VG website, and a channel in the VG Discord, to provide Help & Support for the many users of my profiles - with voice controlled bug reporting to make it easy to let me know when I need to fix something. As I plan to release more and more VoiceAttack profiles for various games, I needed a framework to standardize my methods, and to help keep profiles used by other people up to date and in proper working order. I never quite expected such a large user base, and with that I've decided to offer much more direct support through in-profile options menus and help & support options that tailor themselves to whatever AVCS4 profile is active. By checking for just 8 bytes of an update number on the VG website when loading, AVCS CORE can provide a pop-up choice for users to view the latest changelog, apply the latest patch (or open the website to download a new major update version), or just postpone until later. I've even included an option to turn off minor patch update prompts, and to roll back to the last version if desired! The purpose of this profile is to function as the backbone of any AVCS4 game profiles I release, such as the current AVCS4 Falcon BMS Radios profile, and provide users with a host of profile and update control. When AVCS CORE is first loaded by VoiceAttack, it will initialize itself and any other AVCS4 Profile that is switched to, bringing its full host of commands into the end game profile. This includes the Quick Command Creator and Voice Authorization System, with new commands or codes saved to the Active Profile's save file. Any other AVCS4 Profile that gets switched to will clear and re-load its own QCC Commands or VAS Passphrases (if any), working out of it's own save file as well. Since AVCS CORE needs to load before any other AVCS4 Profile (including the AVCS4 Template Profile), it will be updated the least, and has been tested the most over the past 7 months of development. Included is the AVCS CORE profile package that includes the AVCS CORE Profile and App designed for VoiceAttack, as well as the optional AVCS CORE Framework blank Template Profile for VoiceAttack profile builders. To keep AVCS CORE startup fast for any AVCS4 Profiles, commands cannot be added directly to the CORE Profile, so the Template is available, and can include all of the functionality of AVCS CORE by including the CORE profile commands through its profile options. This profile will have its own save file and config files folder in the VoiceAttack Apps folder along side other AVCS Profiles data. Since AVCS CORE needs to load before any other AVCS4 Profile (including the AVCS4 Template Profile), it will be updated the least, and has been tested the most over the past 7 months of development. I will continue to support all AVCS4 Profiles through AVCS CORE and its powerful profile control options. Say goodbye to the keyboard, and enjoy the immersion! Cheers! I will be running a Public Beta Test for AVCS CORE and AVCS4 Falcon BMS Radios (1.3.90b), and users are encouraged to try out both, or just AVCS CORE and its included Template Profile, if desired. Please use the voice command "Open Help and Support Menu" to communicate any bug reports. These help menus can be expanded without new profile versions, so suggestions are welcome. Thank you for checking out AVCS CORE for VoiceAttack! -Sem (Aug2020) Features: see full details in post ↓
  11. Happy to answer any questions or listen to any suggestions for my AVCS profiles for VoiceAttack! I am available most days to chat directly in the VG Discord AVCS Support Channel, too. If you have AVCS CORE or any AVCS4 Profile powered by AVCS CORE, you can use the command, "Open Help and Support Menu" for helpful links like the one below: Discord channel link https://discord.gg/BR6NjE3 Feel free to create new topics or to reply to this one. Cheers! If you run VA as Admin and hate the UAC Confirmation Prompt pop-up, check out this method I tossed together to use a Windows Task to bypass UAC when launching VA as Admin: https://forum.voiceattack.com/smf/index.php?topic=3517.msg16179#msg16179
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