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Jersans

Need help, PC died.

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48 minutes ago, =Wolf= Jersans said:

Yeah it must be the power supply. I mean even if I made a mistake which I'm sure I didn't the fan from the power supply should do something. Right? 

Anyway guys - quick lesson from Jersans. If you are not a PC expert don't try to fix your PC just have it repaired or buy a new one. Factually I could have a had a brand new PC by now and all I needed to do was connect the hard drives. 

ok, some power supplies have behind a small switch ... it says "on", right?
have you just put the power plug on the mobo or have you also connected the front switch of the rack with? if not, he can not start.

cube-pc-project,P-M-253642-13.png

on your mobo is a connection that should look something like this. there must be a plug of your rack on it. otherwise the switch has no function on your rack.

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1 hour ago, 0100011000101 said:

ok, some power supplies have behind a small switch ... it says "on", right?
have you just put the power plug on the mobo or have you also connected the front switch of the rack with? if not, he can not start.

cube-pc-project,P-M-253642-13.png

on your mobo is a connection that should look something like this. there must be a plug of your rack on it. otherwise the switch has no function on your rack.

Well I ... I just don't get it... Now I have a new power supply. But that also doesn't do a thing.

So bear with me.

I have a brand new motherboard ASUS Z170-A, new memory XPG 8GBx2, new processor Intel i5-8400 LGA1151, new ASUS GTX 1050 Cerberus, new Corsair RM550x and it simply doesn't work. 

Like nothing...

I checked with the guys from the PC shop and they all said it's a good rig should work. So what am I doing wrong then? The only thing I noticed is the motherboard has these two switches. 1.) EZ XMP and 2.) TPU I & II.

No idea what those are for...

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have you connected a and b with a cable from your power supply? 

mobonetzteil.png

and is a plug of your rig on the number 11?

  mobo.jpg

 

what happens if you push number 17?

 

 

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2 hours ago, =Wolf= Jersans said:

1.) EZ XMP and 2.) TPU I & II.

both should not be responsible for this. xmp is for your ram and tpu for ventilation. in doubt, switch tpu off. but that should not be the reson why your system dont start.

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8 minutes ago, 0100011000101 said:

both should not be responsible for this. xmp is for your ram and tpu for ventilation. in doubt, switch tpu off. but that should not be the reson why your system dont start.

Nope I've tried it all and I have had it. I am putting it all in a suitcase and bringing it to the shop and they can get it working. I'm like 200$ over budget and it still doesn't work. Perhaps the motherboard is dead. No idea what I did wrong. But when I rebuild my old PC at least the fans were humming like a butterfly. Still didn't boot but it was working.

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thats weird.  but what happens if you push 17?  really nothing?

when both power cable are pluged, the board has to do something. if not power supply or board is defective. the power supply you could  check on the old computer ... maybe you really got a broken mobo.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, 0100011000101 said:

thats weird.  but what happens if you push 17?  really nothing?

when both power cable are pluged, the board has to do something. if not power supply or board is defective. the power supply you could  check on the old computer ... maybe you really got a broken mobo.

 

 

 

It does zilch, nada, rien, nothing, nande mo nai, niets, nichts...

Basically with either power source just one little green light turns on and that's it... 

I simply don't understand how a brand new motherboard can simply do nothing at all. Don't they test those things before they leave the factory? I mean I rebuild my old PC and the power supply worked fine on that one. So it's the motherboard for sure. I am that unlucky... First the one shop falsely tells me they have a DDR3 and deliver a DDR4 twice. Then I buy a completely different one and it's defective.

So... I'm done. Never going to try this again :)

 

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3 hours ago, =Wolf= Jersans said:

I mean I rebuild my old PC and the power supply worked fine on that one. So it's the motherboard for sure.

jap, then the mobo is broken. but that means your old computer ist working now?

sometimes you can be really unlucky with something like that. if all cables were plugged in and it could not be turned on, but your old computer is running, then the mb is broken.

A few years ago I had a computer that crashed irregularly. When I opened the computer to find the mistake, it disappeared. I have tried everything possible to provoke the error or to find it. Whenever I put the computer in its place, a few days went well and then it all started again. in the end it was then the cable of the graphics card, which had always pulled the graphics card a little bit out of the motherboard... that was the very last thing I would have thought.

So you can be unlucky, broken hardware, incompetent dealers and everything together. But in addition computers always have complex systems which are very prone to errors.

i hope you now have a usable computer ... if you are not completely demotivated and still have questions, ask...

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5 hours ago, 0100011000101 said:

 and tpu for ventilation.

that was nonsens. tpu is to overclock your system automaticly... but it is still not responsible for this.

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Aha... So here's the thing. I bought a coffee lake i5. That's not compatible with this motherboard. Nobody noticed not even the guy in the shop when I asked him.

So my worst case scenario is that they do not take back the motherboard and the CPU is broken because I placed it in which case I'm down about 350$ in the best case scenario my GFX still works and they'll replace the motherboard for a coffee lake suitable one pay a bit extra and I'm done.

*fingers crossed*

And let this be a wise lesson for everyone who thinks 'I can do that...' just don't... I learned my lesson the hard way... 

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The lesson learned should be what we said from the start:  Do your research, educate yourself - even included links to Tom's Hardware guides all about selecting parts and assembling a working PC.  Patience is a virtue, and I feel if you had taken a little more time to read and research, you would have been able to notice the socket set marked on the MoBo box and that it did not match the socket set marked on the CPU box, same with the RAM, etc.  When it comes to assembling parts that each cost several hundred dollars, it's best to know your limitations, or be ready for new challenges.  Were you even wearing an anti-static wrist strap when working with these chips and boards?  Did anyone mention that in this thread beyond a one-time discharging of static prior to touching something?  I feel you could have done much better if you looked before you leapt.

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40 minutes ago, =VG= SemlerPDX said:

The lesson learned should be what we said from the start:  Do your research, educate yourself - even included links to Tom's Hardware guides all about selecting parts and assembling a working PC.  Patience is a virtue, and I feel if you had taken a little more time to read and research, you would have been able to notice the socket set marked on the MoBo box and that it did not match the socket set marked on the CPU box, same with the RAM, etc.  When it comes to assembling parts that each cost several hundred dollars, it's best to know your limitations, or be ready for new challenges.  Were you even wearing an anti-static wrist strap when working with these chips and boards?  Did anyone mention that in this thread beyond a one-time discharging of static prior to touching something?  I feel you could have done much better if you looked before you leapt.

Yep. I was clever enough to touch some metal before handling the parts but it doesn't matter. I learned from my mistake. I've seen dozens of people build their PC my PC etc. It's actually not that hard and I do know how to do it now. But I'm nevertheless never trying again. Not my neck of the woods. Could be worse. Next week all should be good.  

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I'm sorry to say that but semlerpdx is right ...

on the other hand, as a beginner you have no chance if you get misinformation from "secured" sources.

On 18.4.2018 at 5:33 PM, =Wolf= Jersans said:

I checked with the guys from the PC shop and they all said it's a good rig should work. So what am I doing wrong then?

If a pc dealer tells me that this is a good system, then I also assume that it can be used.

That's why I did not see if the parts fit together ...
So the same mistake would have happened to me if I get told by a pc-dealer that it fits. Maybe I would have thought faster that is not the case but something like this is very irritating.
I hope you can give the stuff back and get your money back.

14 minutes ago, =Wolf= Jersans said:

But I'm nevertheless never trying again. Not my neck of the woods.

see it from the other side. you've learned a lot about computer systems. even if you can not do something with it right now, if it gets more it will give you a picture of the whole thing. the next time you buy a pc or parts of it, this will not happen to you anymore... but other things;) read, try and error...read and try again till it works.

10 read

20 try

21 if mind > system then goto 30   -else goto 40

30 have fun, goto 100

40 ...and ERROR! goto 10

100 if fun > mind goto 30   -else shutdown

;)

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17 hours ago, 0100011000101 said:

I'm sorry to say that but semlerpdx is right ...

on the other hand, as a beginner you have no chance if you get misinformation from "secured" sources.

If a pc dealer tells me that this is a good system, then I also assume that it can be used.

That's why I did not see if the parts fit together ...
So the same mistake would have happened to me if I get told by a pc-dealer that it fits. Maybe I would have thought faster that is not the case but something like this is very irritating.
I hope you can give the stuff back and get your money back.

see it from the other side. you've learned a lot about computer systems. even if you can not do something with it right now, if it gets more it will give you a picture of the whole thing. the next time you buy a pc or parts of it, this will not happen to you anymore... but other things;) read, try and error...read and try again till it works.

10 read

20 try

21 if mind > system then goto 30   -else goto 40

30 have fun, goto 100

40 ...and ERROR! goto 10

100 if fun > mind goto 30   -else shutdown

;)

Yes I also agree with Sem. I took it too lightly and was too much in a hurry. I missed some crucial points and what was supposed to be a fun built your own PC turned into an expensive disaster. 

I literally missed a few vital points. Probably the only reason why I am posting my failure publicly is to inform other people that if you want to built or repair your own PC make sure you know exactly what you're doing. Otherwise you end up losing tons of money you may not have and yes, take your time to check and double-check and triple-check. The slightest oversight can cost you hundreds of dollars. 

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4 hours ago, =Wolf= Jersans said:

Probably the only reason why I am posting my failure publicly is to inform other people that if you want to built or repair your own PC make sure you know exactly what you're doing. Otherwise you end up losing tons of money you may not have and yes, take your time to check and double-check and triple-check. The slightest oversight can cost you hundreds of dollars. 

It is important to have a general overview and a few technology skills do not hurt. I have no expert knowledge in all areas but I can read the knowledge that I need quickly, because I can guess what I have to look for and what it could be. It's just important to know what you should not do.
if you know how a circuit works and understood that a computer is not just running but has a thousand individual components that all have to run and harmonize with each other, but are very stupid for themselves, then you start to dominate a system. before that it dominates you because you are stuck to a surface where the desired function is not available.

I have already broken many components in my life and many mistakes cost me days of my life. but all that together has brought me forward rather than annoying me. I handle 4 to 100TB of data a month and have a lot to do with hard drives. when cinema switched from analg to digital, that was a completely new thing. on this way I destroyed dozens of hard disks but also saved a few and now I know how to deal with file systems of various kinds.

what I mean by that, do not let that pull you down, but see it as a guide for the next time.

even if you forget 80% of this again, when you need new memory, you will remember this story, that there is ddr3 and ddr4, that you can not buy any, but the right one and where the dangers might lurk ...


these stupid boxes know only two things: 0 and 1;)
enough of scientific folklore ...

Edited by =VG= SemlerPDX
("stills" changed to "skills")
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39 minutes ago, ranger_12 said:

Just buy new PC life is short LOL

Pretty much that. Even if you fix one part, you never know how quickly another can crack as well. In the end getting a new one should be much more safer.

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1 hour ago, Spartanish said:

Pretty much that. Even if you fix one part, you never know how quickly another can crack as well. In the end getting a new one should be much more safer.

 

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2 hours ago, Spartanish said:

Pretty much that. Even if you fix one part, you never know how quickly another can crack as well. In the end getting a new one should be much more safer.

and if you buy a complete pc then you know when which part breaks? ^ ^ such a nonsense ...

 

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16 hours ago, 0100011000101 said:

and if you buy a complete pc then you know when which part breaks? ^ ^ such a nonsense ...

 

Because?... Unless you buy used one or one from unreliable sources, your new PC should be working perfectly fine for several years. With 8 year old equipment, everything might by already on it's last legs. Only nonsense here is trying to deny that.

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4 hours ago, Spartanish said:

Because?... Unless you buy used one or one from unreliable sources, your new PC should be working perfectly fine for several years. With 8 year old equipment, everything might by already on it's last legs. Only nonsense here is trying to deny that.

lol

 

because new computers are also very often broken, or have in the course of time something between 1 and 4  hardware errors and complett pc are usually very bad matched together.

  Bravo. then buy an iphone and be happy. ^^ you can not prove your folklore either. To say a medion pc would last longer is total nonsense.

just because you have an 8-year-old computer that is still running does not mean anything. I have a 128MB (!) scsi hard disk from the 80tis which is still running. according to your theory, that means that the individual parts last longer ^^

if you have no idea about computers that is totally ok, but then you give others no tips. And above all, no tips that are less to deal with something.
Buying complete systems is often just as stupid as buying brand new cars.
 

5 hours ago, Spartanish said:

Only nonsense here is trying to deny that.

but that says it all;)

 

5 hours ago, Spartanish said:

. Unless you buy used one or one from unreliable sources, your new PC should be working perfectly fine for several years.

can you give me the link to the study? where does this knowledge come from?

Now please do not tell me that you have three friends who also have old pcs ...
Such statements do not even apply to dell, apple or ibm where you can pay more for the support.
you have to look for server technology and appliances with 24/7 use and even these often do not last as long as they should, but your medion-pc rocks on ...; P

 

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Well I be damned, first time I hear about new PCs being 'broken'. Bad matching also sounds like pretty big exaggeration. Sure, many sets often weaker/worse components in comparison to the rest but rarely they are hardware breaking.

No idea how you came with 'my theory'. Only thing I meant  is that there might be more than one thing which require replacement.

Most importantly, I forgot that Jers does not care about newer gaming titles, which means he does not need to upgrade everything to meet requirements to run them.

1 hour ago, 0100011000101 said:

can you give me the link to the study? where does this knowledge come from?

Nope, and yes I am gonna tell that it is from my personal experience and from people I met in school, university and work. Not reliable for you?  Well too bad, I don't care : )

Still, would be nice to see the source of these "broken modern PCs". Might be even interesting.

 

And back to main topic. Only tip I give is pretty much the same what Xenalite already gave. There are professionals  for a reason. Sure he can learn how to do it himself. Too bad it costs both time and effort. And if you **** it up, it's on you only.

As ranger said, life is short as it is. It's not worth it to overcomplicate it.

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6 minutes ago, Spartanish said:

Well I be damned, first time I hear about new PCs being 'broken'.

lol, really?  if you often buy complett pcs, you realize that they often have errors. from the broken usb-port or card reader to the defective memory, everything happens.

 

23 minutes ago, Spartanish said:

Bad matching also sounds like pretty big exaggeration. Sure, many sets often weaker/worse components in comparison to the rest but rarely they are hardware breaking.

no, it's not an exaggeration. if you buy an office computer today, most of them have a ssd built in and a 4gb memory bar. If you take two memory bars, the whole computer would be faster. why you take a normal ssd for the system if you could take a m.2-ssd? right, its cheaper ...
a dealer does not want to do you any good. he wants to make money. especially with computers, you can make a lot of money by installing no-name products, which puts a strain on durability and performance.

 

24 minutes ago, Spartanish said:

No idea how you came with 'my theory'. Only thing I meant  is that there might be more than one thing which require replacement.

You just said that it is safer to buy a new complete computer. and that's not true.
I also buy no new car when the tires or the brakes are broken.

 

30 minutes ago, Spartanish said:

Most importantly, I forgot that Jers does not care about newer gaming titles, which means he does not need to upgrade everything to meet requirements to run them.

good point. if you want to buy a gaming pc, take individual parts or you will be disappointed and/or you will pay much more than necessary.

 

33 minutes ago, Spartanish said:

Nope, and yes I am gonna tell that it is from my personal experience and from people I met in school, university and work. Not reliable for you?  Well too bad, I don't care : )

I can be wrong but you sound like you never bought parts. then that would be a one-sided experience ...

 

37 minutes ago, Spartanish said:

Still, would be nice to see the source of these "broken modern PCs". Might be even interesting.

You will not find any central statistics about defective computer hardware.  but if you are looking for relevant you will find quickly enough material what your statement refutes. actually you only need to look in the support area of lenovo, ibm, asus, dell, toshiba and co ...

 

47 minutes ago, Spartanish said:

There are professionals  for a reason.

The reason is money and because there are people who do not want to deal with computers. 90% of the "professionals" in shops are only sellers and do not have much idea but sales arguments. These "professionals"  have not noticed that he has the wrong cpu in his mobo ^ ^

I think it's just not good  to advise someone not to deal with computers and prefer to buy pc off the rack, if this is in fact always worse. sometimes you are lucky and find cheap and good complete-pcs due to the purchase quantities but then you have to search and you need expert knowledge to identify them.

1 hour ago, Spartanish said:

As ranger said, life is short as it is. It's not worth it to overcomplicate it.

I think that was fun. straight ranger does not always use the easiest way.

 

1 hour ago, Spartanish said:

And back to main topic. Only tip I give is pretty much the same what Xenalite already gave. There are professionals  for a reason. Sure he can learn how to do it himself. Too bad it costs both time and effort. And if you **** it up, it's on you only.

we could not be more offtopic ;) I did not want to attack you personally, but I think it's not good to advise someone not to deal with something and leave that to any professional. you can do that, but it's always better to keep an eye on it and get used to it. even if it costs time and effort. especially when it comes to computers that will not be less in the future and that we will never get rid of again.

this attitude helps apple, ms and other criminals sell even more devices and become even more powerful. look how nice the new iphone looks like ... you do not need to know how it works. either it works or not. if not, buy a new one ...

jersens was just too fast with everything. and I think he will get his money back for everything. in such a distance there was no "fu**up". he only lost time but won knowledge.

 

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No matter which route you go, trusting some so-called "professional" or buying the parts for yourself:  Caveat Emptor = Buyer Beware

In this case, the "professional" did not know about the CPU socket set mis-match, and that is NOT an acceptable mistake on the part of a PC professional.  Also, Jersans did not take the time to educate himself, and therefore, it became the equivalent of Jersans trying to buy a used car to tow his camper caravan, the salesman said, "Sure - this one will tow it", only find out later that the used car has a unibody frame that cannot support a tow hitch attachment.  Life is full of these kinds of choices, and it's the savvy educated consumer who always comes out on top.  Barring that, patience to confer with a TRUSTED professional who can give sound advice every step of the way is the next best option - a close family member with knowledge of the industry (cars, PC's, property/houses, etc.) or perhaps friends who have spent years taking the time and effort to assemble correct knowledge.

 

It's your money, it's your time, it's your own efforts.  Spend them how you wish, and if used properly, all routes will arrive at the same end:  A good, well thought out purchase with no surprises.  As computers are so much more modular, lightweight and easy to assemble than, say, automobiles, it's far easier for a layman to dabble in the field of PC building.  But due to the vast number of similarly named parts, (nVidia 970 vs. a proper use of the same chip on a "good" board like the EVGA AdvancedCoolingXtreme2+ nVidia GTX 970 SuperSuperClocked), not to mention form factor and socket set compatibility concepts, it can be a very confusing and very daunting task to anyone new to it.  My $800 builds would ABSOLUTELY CRUSH most ANY $800 pre-assembled PC off some shelf - that is the power of being a savvy educated consumer.  The only exceptions being items sold from a proper Gaming PC company with massively deep pockets (CyberPower, Xidax, etc.) that assemble proper PC's with proper parts (but then again, these are digital storefronts, and we're talking about computers off a shelf, like at an electronics store or JoeBlow's local PC Shoppe).

 

Buying a cool car like a Mustang is awesome.... Buying a REAL Mustang that can actually perform is amazing.  Sure, they both drive, and both are Mustangs, but not all Mustangs are equivalent as most car guys know, one being a Mustang essentially in name only, the other being the type that can lay down rubber at speed and drive circles around the other - same year, mostly the same look - but NOT the same Mustang.  Caveat Emptor.


Losing your primary PC and quickly trying to dive right on into this without double and triple checking with a proper "TRUSTED" professional before every move is a quick way to lose money, or time, or both.  A good time to begin this is when you still have everything working and you can take your time over weeks or months to read and learn about the parts you may want in your next PC.  What can you re-use from your last, what should be replace because it is nearing the end of it's life expectancy, and what new parts should be added (respecting bottlenecks to dictate where the money is invested).

 

And I would advise NO ONE to buy anything without doing a little research on the item, beit a PC, or a car, etc. etc.  Trust a professional to grab something off the shelf for you if you desire, so long as you understand what you are getting - but in the end, I agree that just grabbing something off a shelf with no pre-desired quality other than "it works" is not a good way to spend money, and is not going to provide you with a good product, either. 

Lemme explain "bad matching" as it was likely meant:  So many boxed PC's sold off a shelf are poorly performing shadows of the "real thing" by which I mean their selling points, often described on a sticker attached to the front panel or side panel, are misleading brand and version names of the core parts inside.  These are too many times the most basic version of that chip/card/drive that can still tote the name you recognize as the "next big thing" or it's basic compatibility i.e. "i5 or i7" or "GTX 1080" or "SSD" or "M.2SATA" or "4K Ready" or "VR Ready".  These components, by comparison of some boxed $800 Medion computer system, would have poor cooling hardware making them unable to achieve what a "proper" GTX 1080 could do, or could be a terrible platform to use for, say, "VR" or "4K".  I mean, stuttering 14 FPS with all graphics on LOW in every game IS technically VR and Vive/Oculus WOULD technically run on that system, chugging along while the consumer thinks, "wow! This is cool! I wonder how cool it would have looked if I bought the $2000 boxed PC next to this one on that same shelf?  Maybe next time, that is what I will buy!"

The savvy consumer always wins.  The educated consumer always gets what he wants.  But, the savvy, educated consumer with time to make moves slowly and evaluate and confer with actual professionals will get his cake, and will get to eat it, too.

"There is no substitute for a goode education"  -Benjamin Franklin

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3 hours ago, =VG= SemlerPDX said:

"There is no substitute for a goode education"

can you prove that? ; P


just fun. ;) I can only agree with this.

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