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      Red Tide Part IV   05/21/2017

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HaterOneActual

Comms Protocol

20 posts in this topic

I know I need to be  better about my comms protocol....and so do some of you.

Here are some basics if you want to brush up or you are a new player looking to get your lingo down.

Radio communication – basic rules

Military radio communication procedures and basic data.

 

While exchanging the messages over the radio you should follow some basic rules to comply with international standards, both in the civil and military conditions alike. Below you will find the basic, fixed radio phraseology used for the purpose of radio transmissions along with some military procedures to follow.

 

 

 

Universal rules of radio communication

1)    Before you press the transmission button, gather your thoughts about what you are going to say. Many people with radios have a tendency to talk and/or repeat too much. Say what you need to say without unnecessary repeats. Keep in mind that your message should go through the first time – you may not have any opportunity to repeat it.

2)    Give the call sign of the unit you are calling first. It will alert the addressee to focus on the incoming message. There might be more listeners and radio network users so you must let them know that this time there will be a message for them, not a usual background noise.

3)    Introduce yourself by your call sign. Do not use real names or nicknames.

4)    Don’t speak too fast especially if the message needs to be written down. Pause after logical phrases. High voice does not guarantee that you will be more readable.

5)    Use “CLEAR”, “OVER”, “OUT” when you finish your message. It notifies the addressee that you finished your portion of information and wait for the response or just ended the transmission (“OUT” word).

6)    When you have understood the message, acknowledge the receipt with the words “COPY“, “RECEIVED“, “ROGER” or “ACKNOWLEDGED.” The word “COPY” is preferred.

7)    If the caller requires some actions you may use “WILCO” instead of “ROGER” to notify that you WILL COMPLY (=”WILCO”).

8)    Use “BREAK, BREAK” whenever there is a radio traffic and you want to get through with your emergency message.

9)    Answer each call to confirm reception. Use “RECEIVED”, “COPY”, “ROMEO” or “ACKNOWLEDGED.”

10)    If you do not comprehend the message, do not confirm it. Use “SAY AGAIN”, “REPEAT”, “STAND BY” instead.

11)    Whenever a word must be spelled use NATO code words for each letter. Do not invent your own words – they might be misleading and not comprehensive.

12)    Use single, cardinal numbers, do not combine them into bigger numbers.

 

Call out

Radio operators in the army. Basic communication rules and procedures.

 

When you want to initiate radio exchange, first you must call out the addressee of your message. To notify the addressee about incoming message call him/her twice, giving his/her call sign.

 

 

 

First address who you are calling:

Example: White Chicken 07, White Chicken 07…

Then give your call sign:

Example: this is COYOTE, OVER.

Then you patiently await a reply - if no reply comes, you repeat your call.  Remember they may be in the middle of a communication you cannot hear on a different radio!

The reply for the above example should be:

Example:  COYOTE, this is White Chicken 07 - go ahead...

When you expect the other party to answer, finish your portion of message with a word “OVER”, like in the example above.

If there is a traffic on the air, use “BREAK, BREAK” to cut into the network. Only in case of higher priority of your message!

 

Quality of transmission

In case of some interference or just to confirm how your message was received you may need to ask about the reception. In this instance we use “HOW DO YOU COPY?” or even shorter “HOW COPY?” To ask about general quality of the reception you may also ask “HOW DO YOU READ?

There are two ways of responding to such questions. You may simply answer “COPY LOUD AND CLEAR” (=”LIMA CHARLIE”) or give the answerer the notion of the signal quality by giving the note from 1 to 5.

Example:  COPY 3 out of 5

The meaning of numbers used in assessment over the radio:

1 = Bad (unreadable);
2 = Poor (readable now and then);
3 = Fair (readable but with difficulty);
4 = Good (readable);
5 = Excellent (perfectly readable).

 

When repeat is needed

It may happen that due to poor transmission or distracting factors some pieces of information should be repeated to avoid misunderstandings. In that case you may request repeat by saying “SAY AGAIN.”

Likewise, when you want to stress the importance of the message or simply make sure that important data get through, you say your message and then use
I SAY AGAIN” and repeat the message.

EXAMPLE: I need five more minutes, I SAY AGAIN, five more minutes…

 

 

Learn the NATO Phonetic Alphabet

A

Alpha    

B

Bravo

O

Oscar

C

Charlie

P

Papa

D

Delta

Q

Quebec

E

Echo

R

Romeo

F

Foxtrot

S

Sierra

G

Golf

T

Tango

H

Hotel

U

Uniform

I

India

V

Victor

J

Juliet

W

Whiskey

K

Kilo

X

X-ray

L

Lima

Y

Yankee

M

Mike

Z

Zulu

N

November    

 

 

Enunciate Numbers in radio transmission

It is a common practice to say numbers with each digit separately. For instance we say “CHARLIE TWO-THREE” instead of “CHARLIE TWENTY THREE.” Additionally, to avoid misunderstandings two particular numerals are pronounced differently:

4 = [foer]

9 = [niner]

0 = [zeerow]

 

Defense.gov_News_Photo_070108-F-8006M-084-846x576.jpg

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Excellent comms guide and tips!!  Thank you, Hater!  We gotta keep it short, sweet, and clear on comms --- we get to joking around on the mics in games which is just fine, but know when it's time to snap back into Operator mode and clear the comms when asked.

For the Viper Pilots here, in Falcon BMS, we get squelch when someone tries to transmit while another is already transmitting on the same radio - in this example, a "BREAK, BREAK" should be simulated by two separate bursts of squelch (press COMMS HAT Forward or Back two times on the UHF or VHF radio respectively).  

On VG BMS Server, If you hear two sounds in a row like this, drop comms (release transmit) to allow for the other transmission.  It could be far more important AND time sensitive!

 

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Excellent post on comms netiquette Hater. 

Most common problem for SL is getting ear bashed by other squad leader communication that is not necessarily relevant to your current squad, while hearing all the banter between squad members. So sometimes when we get an order from the commander it is pretty easy to miss or not even hear their orders. Perhaps some advice on properly clearing comms when an important instruction is being received? I'm all for having fun but sometimes its bloody hard to hear above the chatter/banter.

What is the standard procedure when it comes to a squad lead communicating to another squad about a threat, should that go directly to the affected squad leader or should it be relayed to the commander? If we don't have a commander its pretty obvious that its direct communication.

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3 hours ago, Kavelenko said:

 

What is the standard procedure when it comes to a squad lead communicating to another squad about a threat, should that go directly to the affected squad leader or should it be relayed to the commander? If we don't have a commander its pretty obvious that its direct communication.

This would also have to depend on the situation, if we are under a direct fire, contact protocol usually states that they go to command.  This is because they are not in the field and have the best ability to hear what is going on. Protocol then dictates that GOTWA comes into effect and sends a squad over for support since it is assumed that the location has been compromised, if the area is a necessary locationed needed for the battle (such as a flag). 

However, if most of the time we are rolling with out a commander a direct line of contract and then do an "all squad call" to update heavy contact or situation updates if needed. As a rule of thumb, a SL should not be direct line of fire, however some situations dictate that you are a rifleman and your wepon is needed. Since we do not have operator kits, you are the direct line of communication to the others in the field. 

I appreciate the effort going into uncreasing communication. Granted it is a video game, but it makes our lives easier if we can all get out on the same page and cut down reinforcements to bots, have a laze for CAS or let people know avout the incomming AREA ATTACK AND GTFO OF THE OPERATING AREA!

I also think you folks now undetstand why I transmit the radio calls I do when I communicate with squads, other leaders, and in TS. 

FRIENDLY INFANTRY SQ OUT. How copy?

If you ever have a chance, watch youtube for a Movie called Airplane for a joke about this.

 

Roger Murdock: Flight 2-0-9'er, you are cleared for take-off.
Captain Oveur: Roger!
Roger Murdock: Huh?
Tower voice: L.A. departure frequency, 123 point 9'er.
Captain Oveur: Roger!
Roger Murdock: Huh?
Victor Basta: Request vector, over.
Captain Oveur: What?
Tower voice: Flight 2-0-9'er cleared for vector 324.
Roger Murdock: We have clearance, Clarence.
Captain Oveur: Roger, Roger. What's our vector, Victor?
Tower voice: Tower's radio clearance, over!
Captain Oveur: That's Clarence Oveur. Over.
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Raptor : Steel Rain, this is Raptor. Adjust fire, system aided, over.

Steel Rain : Raptor, this is Steel Rain, adjust fire, system aided, out.

Raptor : Ten digit grid, November Uniform 6 7 3 1 2 0 9 5 7 1, over.

Steel Rain : Ten digit grid, November Uniform 6 7 3 1 2 0 9er 5 7 1, out.

Steel Rain : Message to observer, Charlie, two rounds, five guns in effect, target number Alpha Bravo 1 0 0 4, over.

Raptor : Message to observer, Charlie, two rounds, five guns in effect, target number Alpha Bravo 1 0 0 4, out.

Steel Rain : Shot, over.

Raptor : Shot, out.

Steel Rain : Splash, over.

Raptor : Splash, out.

Raptor : Ten digit impact grid November Uniform 6 7 2 1 4 0 9 6 1 1, correct fire for effect, over.

Steel Rain : Ten digit impact grid November Uniform 6 7 2 1 4 0 9er 6 1 1, correct fire for effect, out.

Raptor : Record this target, end of mission, target suppressed, over.

Steel Rain : Record this target, end of mission, target suppressed, out.

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1 hour ago, =VG= m823us said:

 


Roger Murdock: Flight 2-0-9'er, you are cleared for take-off.
Captain Oveur: Roger!
Roger Murdock: Huh?
Tower voice: L.A. departure frequency, 123 point 9'er.
Captain Oveur: Roger!
Roger Murdock: Huh?
Victor Basta: Request vector, over.
Captain Oveur: What?
Tower voice: Flight 2-0-9'er cleared for vector 324.
Roger Murdock: We have clearance, Clarence.
Captain Oveur: Roger, Roger. What's our vector, Victor?
Tower voice: Tower's radio clearance, over!
Captain Oveur: That's Clarence Oveur. Over.

 Gotta love old movies. Cracks me up every time.

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Posted (edited)

If everyone used this I would be playing this fu**ing thing till I collapsed. This is what I first installed PR for because at the time I had learned the entire NATO alphabet for no real reason. I think we should start enforcing this more. Also, how do I save a thread or something like that? Do I just Ctrl V it on a notepad doc?

You're my hero, Hater. Over.

EDIT: "Over" has now become a meme. People have been saying "over" in local chat and then laughing their asses off for a couple of rounds since I was talking about it to a squad member. He said "over" in local and I did the same, then someone else did it, then others. Praise the over meme, over.

Edited by FrankoIT
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This reminds me of arma Acre comms, Feel like a lot of you would get a kick out of it. Leading a 9 man squad, 2 fireteams with a short range squad net (That can be broken by terrain) with a long range Platoon net, and then a company net with company assets such as MBT's and air on. So much communication going on and these processes have to be stuck to for the sake of sanity not just to look good. So many callsigns and voices operating on everynet. Think you'd all love that. Its very nice when you have to have squads relaying things to command and such due to you being in a large depression or such and the actual radio signals come in broken often in those times.

 

 

Only bit of info thats worth noting, maybe not applicable in this scenario but as general information. When you call "HowCopy?" The answer is rated as "How much can you understand?" And "What is my signals strength?"

 

So "How Copy?"

"3 by 2 at this time."

"Wait one, Adjustment."

"How copy?"

"5 by  4. Solid Copy."

 

As well as the word "Repeat" should never be used upon net as its a signal for a repeated ordanace usage and could me mistaken at anytime. Repeat is a Battle Damage Assessment Keyword for Return to strike target.

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The more we use this sort of stuff, the more fun and easy it will be to communicate - but just try not to be too forceful on casual players cuz we do still have a bit of fun in our games.  Just that it's helpful when required to know proper protocols ahead of time.

You don't read a survival manual after you're stranded - and you can't teach a drowning man to swim. ;)

 

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Thanks for this post @HaterOneActual. Really good read and I've definitely taken away some pointers!

Also, correct me if I'm wrong here, BREAK (along with a pause) can also be used to "Break-up" a sentence. This helps in bringing critical information forward in long transmissions.

For example, you are transmitting an enemy location to friendlies:

"BE ADVISED, I have six contacts, bearing 1-2-4 Degrees, from my position -BREAK- One contact armed with an RPG, Advise our APCs to remain clear -BREAK- We are pinned down and require assistance. How copy? Over"

 

Also, this video could be useful:

 

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LIMA CHARLIE = loud and clear 

Lima Zulu = Landing Zone

Bravo Sierra = Bullshit 

Charlie Foxtrot = Clusterfuck

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot = WTF

Good to know. We have some more excamples? 

Should i call the CAS squad now Charlie - Alpha - Sierra ?

Should we make our own Military Radio Dictionary?

 

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Sierra Tango Foxtrot Uniform (STFU) =  to clear the comms :)

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1 hour ago, =VG= Kavelenko said:

Sierra Tango Foxtrot Uniform (STFU) =  to clear the comms :)

lol!  Doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. :sarcastic: At least the acronym doesn't have more syllables than the phrase... like GSW (gunshot wound) 

16 hours ago, FrankoIT said:

Also, how do I save a thread or something like that? Do I just Ctrl V it on a notepad doc?

it would be easier to copy the link to this page and Ctrl V it to a notepad doc - the pic's won't transfer, or the tables or formatting.  It's HTML.

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You must do it Oldschool. Write it down with Pen & Paper. 

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15 hours ago, =VG= Blazer said:

Also, correct me if I'm wrong here, BREAK (along with a pause) can also be used to "Break-up" a sentence. This helps in bringing critical information forward in long transmissions.

For example, you are transmitting an enemy location to friendlies:

"BE ADVISED, I have six contacts, bearing 1-2-4 Degrees, from my position -BREAK- One contact armed with an RPG, Advise our APCs to remain clear -BREAK- We are pinned down and require assistance. How copy? Over"

In this scenario you'd simply say the word "Break" To indicate your changing points. You'd cut the first Break out because its still a priority contact report. And would have only one Break, In reality the stenance would read

"BE ADVISED, I have six contacts, bearing 1-2-4 Degrees, from my position, One contact armed with an RPG.  -BREAK- Advise APCs remain clear, Squad(Callsign) pinned down and require assistance. Over"

The word  break would usually be used but this is a long radio transmition (About 7 seconds) So the break in this could actually be either the word break stated or an actual break in the transmition. It depends on how heated the situation is if you dont have time to mess about with the radio you'd call the word break and continue. If you're able to sit and wait the 1.5 second break time then you can simply unkey the radio wait and rekey to continue the point.

The main point of speaking on a radio is just getting your point across quickly. These communication tips are used because it standardises. It dosent mean you can't break the protocal to get something across quickly.

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9 hours ago, Xenalite said:

giphy.gif

 

New local chat meme.

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Ha! This is awesome! 

I always used to say: 'radio silence until further notice' when my squad was blablabla-ing like a bunch of hyperactive teenage girls and I was trying to coordinate with other squads and or commander typically I would always say 'okay boys radio silence is over' but one time I simply forgot and we ran into a firefight and no one says a word until while I am trying to coordinate and this brilliant guy goes: 'can we break radio silence sir, sir!!!' I laughed my ass off and said 'yeah my bad call your fucking targets!!!' 

Okay I guess it was one of those you should have been there moments... ;) 

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Whoa! Congrats new =VG= members! You all earned it! 

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Awesome post  man.   Most interesting. Never knew "wilco" meant "will comply".  :blush2:

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